Yard full of fun

first_imgThousands of Harvard College students flocked to Tercentenary Theatre in Harvard Yard on Friday, but instead of heading into classrooms or libraries, they raced through inflatable labyrinths, drenched Harvard administrators, and danced on the “boardwalk.”Coordinated by the College Events Board, a student-run organization, the “Welcome Back Event” greets new and returning students with an outdoor festival. This year’s event transformed Harvard Yard into a carnival, complete with a bounce house, dunk tank, games, music, and carnival food.Just outside Widener Library, Melissa Naidoo ’13 was celebrating her birthday by racing through the bounce house against Currier House blockmate Nadia Farjood ’13. “The Welcome Back is an awesome event. I come to it every year,” Naidoo said. “It’s such a great way to start the semester. You see students from all the Houses, and run into people you haven’t seen all summer. As the night progresses, I’m sure I’m going to find at least 12 people I haven’t seen yet, so I’m really excited.”Isabelle Link-Levy ’13 (from left) and Jeanine Sinanan-Singh ’13 relax during the festivities, which drew students to Tercentenary Theatre celebrating the return of the academic year.“There are few opportunities for the entire College to come together as a community,” said Evelynn M. Hammonds, dean of Harvard College. “The College Events Board does a terrific job of organizing this and other events every year. It’s a perfect way for us to welcome all our returning students back to campus and to introduce our new students to life at Harvard.”Across Tercentenary Theatre, David Kilstein ’16 was the first to successfully submerge David R. Friedrich, assistant dean of Harvard College for student life, in the dunk tank. Kilstein celebrated his victory with some fried dough.“I played baseball throughout elementary and middle school,” he said of the throw that sent Friedrich into the water. “It felt good to be able to draw on my glory days.”At the beanbag toss, Miriam Psychas ’13 and Laura D’Asaro ’13, both of Kirkland House, enjoyed the chance to reconnect. “Welcome Back is a fantastic event,” D’Asaro said. “It’s one of my favorites of the whole year. Harvard students get to do things like jump on bounce houses and play games. It takes you out of the academic world for a minute, and we can just have fun.”While another brave volunteer sat on the dunk tank seat, David Kilstein ’16 was the first to successfully submerge David R. Friedrich, assistant dean of Harvard College for student life, later that evening.last_img read more

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WHO flu pandemic task force begins work

first_imgSep 26, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – An international group of experts that will advise the World Health Organization (WHO) on avian and pandemic influenza issues met for the first time yesterday in Geneva, Switzerland.Task force members will advise the WHO on the critical questions of when to raise the pandemic alert level, when to declare a pandemic, and how to handle the international response, according to the WHO. The panel is called the Ad Hoc Influenza Pandemic Task Force.The task force is a temporary body that will advise the agency until the new International Health Regulations take effect in June 2007, according to a WHO news release. The new regulations were approved by the World Health Assembly in May 2005. The rules, version of which have been in effect since 1951, are designed to prevent the international spread of diseases.The new rules require member countries to have or develop specific capabilities to identify and respond to public health emergencies of international concern and to take routine preventive measures at ports, airports, and border stations. The recent revision took into account lessons learned during the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak and the ongoing H5N1 avian influenza experience.At yesterday’s meeting, the task force mainly covered administrative tasks, such as setting roles and responsibilities, deciding how meetings will be run, and discussing how to hold emergency sessions via tele- or video conferencing. They also agreed to serve as an advisory group to WHO’s Global Influenza Programme.Of the 21 task force members, 16 were present at the first meeting, the Associated Press (AP) reported today. Absent were members from China, Indonesia, and Thailand.A Canadian Press report named several of the experts who are on the task force. They include Dr. Robert Webster, St. Jude’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.; Albert Osterhaus, a veterinary virologist from Erasmus University in Rotterdam; Dr. Nancy Cox, director of the influenza division at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); Theresa Tan, director of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s respiratory infections division; Dr. Maria Zambon from Britain’s public health agency; Masato Tashiro, director of Japan’s National Institute of Infectious Diseases; and Dmitri Lvov, a virologist from Russia.”How often we meet will be determined by the evolving avian influenza situation,” Osterhaus told the AP. “But of course we hope it’s as little as possible.”See also:Sep 26 WHO press releasehttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2006/np28/en/index.htmlMay 24 CIDRAP news article “WHO updates rules to prevent spread of disease”http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/bioprep/news/may2405regs.htmllast_img read more

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New South Africa coach Boucher savours winning start

first_imgBy Mark GleesonPRETORIA, South Africa (Reuters) – South Africa coach Mark Boucher said winning his first Test match in charge was as good as the many victories he enjoyed as a player after his maiden triumph against England on Sunday.The 107-run victory in the first Test at Centurion Park came a fortnight after Boucher, 43, was appointed to the post after a shake-up of Cricket South Africa’s structures at the start of the month.“I’ve played quite a few Ttest matches and we won a couple of good ones but certainly this is up there, especially from where we have come,” he said. “It has been a hectic two weeks;, we’ve put in a lot of hard work as a coaching staff, so this is a reward.“I’m also very happy for the players and the way they approached it,” Boucher added.“We said before we wanted to instil some confidence back in the players and to see them walk off the field with a win. You can see now there is a belief that we can win Test matches against very good teams.” Boucher took over the domestic Titans franchise in 2016 and within a year was named Coach-of-the-Year. He now has a contract with South Africa until 2023.“We understand there is a long way to go,” he said. “We’ve got a couple of youngsters we need to impart knowledge to and speed up the process of becoming experienced cricketers and we’ll certainly do that.”Boucher, one of the world’s best wicketkeepers, had his playing career ended in horrific fashion in a freak incident in Taunton in 2012 where he got hit by a ball in the left eye, losing his lens, iris and pupil. It brought a premature end to a 147-Test career in which he took a world record 999 dismissals in all forms of cricket so to return to the South Africa dressing room was a thrill.“I’ve been out of international cricket for quite some time now so it’s an honour for me to walk back into that changing room and be part of hopefully a change in South African cricket,” he said.“There have been quite a few changes but the spirit and passion is still there. I’m looking forward to the challenge and working hard with the guys and seeing them develop,” Boucher added.last_img read more

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FC Sarajevo Qualified in the Third Round of Europe League

first_imgThe footballers of the Sarajevo team placed themselves in the third qualifying round of UEFA European League.Sarajevo played yesterday against Haugesund and won 3:1. The first match, played at Koševo stadium, ended with 1:0 for Haugesund. Ševko Okić (36., 82.) scored two goals and Miloš Stojčev (21.) scored one goal. For the team of Haugesund Maic Sema scored one goal (48.).After the 79th minute when Džemal Berberović was excluded, Sarajevo played without one player.The Sarajevo team will play in the third qualifying round against the team Atromitos from Greece.The matches will take place on July 31th and August 7th. (Source: Fena)last_img read more

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Capital High School Student Lauren Frasier to Study Russian in Moldova…

first_imgFacebook381Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y)Lauren Fraiser, Capital High SchoolLauren Frasier, a high school student in Olympia, Washington, has been awarded a National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) scholarship for 2015-16. Lauren will study Russian in Moldova for the summer.Lauren is one of only 620 competitively selected students from across the United States who will receive a scholarship to study Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Persian, Russian, or Turkish overseas this year. While in Moldova, Lauren will receive formal instruction and informal language practice in an immersion environment.The NSLI-Y program seeks to increase the number of Americans who can engage with native speakers of critical languages. The goals of the NSLI-Y program include sparking a life-long interest in foreign languages and cultures, and developing a corps of young Americans with the skills necessary to advance international dialogue and crosscultural opportunities in the private, academic, and government sectors.NSLI-Y is administered by American Councils for International Education in cooperation with AFS-USA, American Cultural Exchange Service, AMIDEAST, Chinese Language and Culture Center of Maine, iEARN-USA, Legacy International, Russian American Foundation, Stony Brook University, the University of Delaware, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Wisconsin.Applications for 2016-2017 NSLI-Y programs are expected to be available at http://www.nsliforyouth.org in the early fall. For information about U.S. Department of State-sponsored exchange programs click here.last_img read more

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Deforestation, climate crisis could crash Amazon tree diversity: study

first_imgNew research finds that when climate change and deforestation impacts are taken together, up to 58 percent of Amazon tree species richness could be lost by 2050, of which 49 percent would have some degree of risk for extinction.Under the deforestation/climate change scenario, half the Amazon (the north, central and west) could be reduced to 53 percent of the original forest. The other half (the east, south and southeast, where agribusiness occurs), could become extremely fragmented, with only 30 percent of forest remaining.Studies rarely take both climate change and deforestation into account. But the new study’s results bolster the findings of other scientists who have modeled results showing that when the Amazon is 20-25 percent deforested, it could cross a rainforest to savanna conversion tipping point, a disaster for biodiversity.Scientists warn that Jair Bolsonaro’s anti-environmental policies could result in a worst-case scenario, with severe damage to the Amazon rainforest and to its ecological services, including the loss of the sequestration of vast amounts of stored carbon, leading to a regional and global intensification of climate change. The Amazon rainforest is a cloud factory and has a tremendous influence on the weather and climate of South America. But deforestation and climate change could combine to greatly diminish the rainforest’s extent and diversity. Image courtesy by Hans ter Steege.The combined impact of ongoing deforestation and escalating climate change on the Amazon rainforest could radically transform its configuration by 2050, with the biome divided into two distinct blocks — one occupied by still significant but very seriously diminished rainforest, the other dominated by agribusiness and scattered forest inside conserved areas.That shift, were it to occur, could result in a decline of up to 58 percent of Amazon tree species richness, of which 49 percent would have some degree of risk for extinction (with tree species becoming vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered), according to a new study published in Nature Climate Change. The authors of the paper — four researchers from Brazil and the Netherlands — determined that both deforestation and climate change had to be examined together, and not separately as is typically done, in order to determine a realistic future scenario.To the researchers’ surprise, when the effects were combined in their models, the tree species loss numbers were very high.Under the deforestation/climate change scenario, one half of the Amazon (the northern, central and western portions) would be reduced to 53 percent of the original forest, although still with continuous areas. The other half (the eastern, southern and southeastern areas, where agribusiness activities currently take place), would become extremely fragmented, with only 30 percent of forest remaining; remnant vegetation would be found primarily in protected areas and indigenous reserves.Map showing forest coverage projections for 2050. Only half of the Amazonian forest may remain in 2050 under the worst-case deforestation/climate combined scenario. The blue areas show a relatively intact Amazonian forest continuous block, composed of northwestern and central Amazonia, the Guiana Shield and a smaller part of southwestern Amazonia. The red areas are a largely degraded and fragmented Amazonian forest block composed of eastern, southern and a major part of southwestern Amazonia. The light yellow areas indicate forest loss. Image © Esri, DeLorme Publishing Company, Arcworld.Two scenarios for 2050 were highlighted by the study, a more optimistic one — in which Paris Climate Agreement carbon targets are achieved and global temperature warms by less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) — and a more pessimistic one based on recent rising trends in deforestation and CO2 emissions.In the more pessimistic scenario, Amazonian tree species would lose up to 65 percent of their spatial distribution area (where they live and reproduce), and up to 58 percent of their diversity; 49 percent would be threatened with extinction, of which 22 percent would be critically endangered, according to IUCN’s threatened extinction criteria.Even the more optimistic scenario “does not indicate a promising future,” Vitor Gomes, an environmental scientist at the Federal University of Pará and the lead study author told Mongabay. That scenario predicts a loss of tree species richness of up to 43 percent, and a decline in tree species distribution area of up to 53 percent; under that scenario, 48 percent of tree species would be threatened, of which 11 percent would be critically endangered.“The study should be seen as a big warning,” said Ima Vieira, a researcher at the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi and a study co-author. “It shows that if deforestation is currently the biggest cause of habitat loss in the Amazon, over the next thirty years it will probably be surpassed by climate change, which operates throughout the whole biome and can alone reduce species diversity by up to 37 percent.”“It was not so clear to us how much the climate could affect the forest in the future,” Gomes added. “Deforestation is no longer the only major threat to the Pan-Amazon,” a biome designation that includes portions of nine South American countries.Excluding climate change impacts, deforestation alone could cause Amazon species diversity losses of 19 percent (in the best scenario) or 36 percent (in the worst), while climate change could cause reductions of 31 percent to 37 percent, respectively.The Amazon’s Rio Negro River. The new study does not offer findings as to how a drastic decline in forest cover might impact the Amazon’s rivers and aquifers, though other studies point to a severe increase in drought which would dramatically reduce water available to ecosystems and agribusiness. Image courtesy by Hans ter Steege.No time for migrationThe researchers analyzed the current distribution area of 6,394 tree species with available data among the 10,071 known Amazon tree species. They then compared that present data with both historical data (1950-2000) and projected deforestation data (up to 2050), along with current and future climate scenarios as determined by the United Nations IPCC (UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).From this total species data, they eliminated rare species with insufficient records available to produce distribution models, and species without statistically significant models, leaving a total of 4,935 species.Mapping the locations where the species can be found today is important to obtain temperature and precipitation limits in which they are apparently comfortable.“The trees will find less favorable conditions [as climate change escalates] to keep existing and propagating,” explained Gomes. “Because they are static, they are slow to migrate to new areas through dispersers and pollinators [such as wind, water and animals].” The study gives as a reference the Holocene, a geological period that started about 11,600 years ago, when climate change caused Amazonian tree communities to expand their distribution southward.“It took them 3,000 years to advance nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles). Man-induced climate change is happening now, and trees will be unable to move in 30 years or so more than 300 kilometers (186 miles), the distance to which the most suitable climates may be in relation with the current distribution areas [by 2050]. Not to mention that deforested areas [caused by agribusiness and other human development] make it even more difficult for trees to move forward once that barrier has been created,” Gomes said.Tree species found in the lower half of the Amazon — such as the Protium altissimum (Aubl.) Marchand, the second most abundant in the biome, for example — may face a serious threat of extinction as the species suffers losses of up to 50 percent of its suitable distribution area. While Eperua falcata Aubl., common in the Guiana Shield, could lose up to 63 percent of its suitable distribution area.Rainforest near Manaus, capital of Amazonas state, Brazil. Under the deforestation/climate change scenario, half the Amazon could be reduced to 53 percent of the original forest, while the other half (where agribusiness occurs), could become extremely fragmented, with only 30 percent of forest remaining. Image courtesy by Hans ter Steege.Agreement with previous studiesCarlos Nobre, a respected Brazilian climatologist and senior researcher at the University of São Paulo, along with Thomas Lovejoy, a U.S. ecologist at George Mason University, have estimated that deforestation and climate change combined could cause a large part of the Amazon biome to experience a rainforest to savanna conversion tipping point when around 20 to 25 percent of the biome is deforested.Nobre commented on the new study: “The results are quite credible as projections of the synergistic effect of climate change, due to global warming, and deforestation, on the distribution of species in the Amazon. In our studies, we looked at the rainforest as a biome, not species by species, as in their study, and we analyzed the risks of change in the type of vegetation — that is, the forest being replaced by a savanna.”However, “The results of these two kinds of analysis are similar: higher impacts in the south and east of the Amazon, while the forest would remain in the west,” Nobre said. “The study strongly reinforces our projections and recommendations for a development model with zero deforestation or, better still, the restoration of large deforested areas” in the Amazon.Paulo Brando, an ecologist at the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, USA, noted that “the division of the Amazon in the middle is not necessarily a surprise. Previous studies, such as Duffy et al. 2015, have shown that the Eastern Amazon could be[come] drier and hotter with climate change, while the west would be more rainy. That said, the results are of immense importance for the conservation of the rainforest.“With the reduction of deforestation, Brazil could avoid the loss of occupation areas of hundreds of species. Without a global effort to stabilize the climate, however, some species would still be threatened. Thus, reducing deforestation would help not only to stabilize the climate but also to prevent habitat loss,” Brando concluded.The Ecuadorian Amazon. New research points to a drastic decline in Amazon tree species diversity if rising deforestation and worsening climate change are not curbed. But the present political situation, especially in Brazil where far-right President Jair Bolsonaro came to power this year, seems unlikely to foster stronger forest protections or climate initiatives. Image courtesy by Hans ter Steege.(Un)protected areasThe new research also highlights the crucial role of the currently existing network of protected areas and indigenous lands in the Amazon. Those areas can help buffer the loss of species diversity against future impacts.“Even though [trees inside protected areas] are not totally immune to climate change, our models show that forests outside protected areas can lose up to a third more species,” said Gomes. “That’s why the preservation [of conserved areas] and the creation of corridors between them are so necessary, allowing biological dispersion and the migration of animals. Otherwise there will be only forest patches left in the Amazon.”Vieira, of the Museu Paraense (linked with the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation and Communications), said that it’s not difficult to imagine the most pessimistic study scenario becoming reality, given the trouble the world’s nations are having in achieving their carbon reduction goals as expressed in the 2015 Paris Agreement, as well as the difficulty Brazil has had in controlling deforestation, first under the Temer administration and now under the Bolsonaro administration.June 2019 deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon increased by 88 percent as compared to the same month in 2018, and while this result is preliminary many analysts fear that 2019 could show a significant annual rise in deforestation.However, the nation isn’t responding by curbing deforestation, rather its policies appear to be encouraging the opposite. In May, Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles proposed a reevaluation of all 334 federal conservation units, with an eye on reducing the size of some, and abolishing others. More recently he declared without offering any scientific evidence that Brazil has already reached “zero relative deforestation,” that is, deforestation in the Amazon represents, according to him, “0.002 percent of the biome.” Later he said the correct number is 0.16 percent.Vieira responded: “There is a political scenario unfavorable to the environment in the country [of Brazil], with budget cuts in the environmental and scientific areas, reduction of operations in environmental control and inspection, setbacks in environmental legislation, freezing of indigenous lands demarcations and the threat of opening [indigenous reserves] to mining activities.“To save the Amazon from destruction, initiatives should consider an integrated vision of the region, long-term public policies, respect for environmental legislation, as well as for indigenous territories and peoples, and there should be strong economic pressure to restrict the sale of products from deforested areas and protected areas of the Amazon,” Vieira concluded.Citation:Gomes, V. H. F., Vieira, I. C. G., Salomão, R.P., & ter Steege, H. (2019). Amazonian tree species threatened by deforestation and climate change. Nature Climate Change, 9(7), 547-553.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

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Indonesian fire expert awarded for exposing destruction by plantation firms

first_imgBanner image: Bambang Hero Saharjo, a forestry expert from the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), speaks during a press conference in Jakarta, Indonesia. Image by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.  Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img An Indonesian fire expert who has testified in 500 cases against companies accused of allowing fires on their concessions has been awarded the John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science.Bambang Hero Saharjo has weathered a series of threats as well as a retaliatory lawsuit over the years by companies he has testified against.The award committee lauded Bambang for continuing “to testify and stand up for the Indonesian people’s constitutional right to a healthy environment, one of the very few scientists in his field who are prepared to do so.”A further prize for an early-career recipient was awarded to Canadian pharmacist Olivier Bernard, who has challenged alternative-health proponents pushing for evidence-free high-dose vitamin C injections for cancer patients. JAKARTA — Indonesian forensics expert Bambang Hero Saharjo has been awarded a top environmental prize for his work in delivering justice against oil palm plantations accused of allowing fires on their concessions.Bambang was one of 206 nominees from 38 countries for the John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science, now in its eighth year. The announcement of the award, a joint initiative by the charity Sense about Science and the scientific journal Nature, was made at a ceremony in London on Nov. 12.The judges called Bambang, from the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), “the foremost expert on illegal and destructive forest and land fires in Indonesia.”“Bambang’s expertise allows him to trace the route and source of fires and he has testified in 500 court cases investigating fires,” Sense about Science said in a statement. “He continues to testify and stand up for the Indonesian people’s constitutional right to a healthy environment, one of the very few scientists in his field who are prepared to do so.”It also cited the frequent attempts by companies Bambang has testified against to silence him, primarily through litigation known as SLAPP, or strategic lawsuit against public participation, none of which have held up in court.Bambang Hero Saharjo, an Indonesian fire expert, speaks during a ceremony in London where he accepted the 2019 John Maddox Prize. Image courtesy of Bambang Hero Saharjo.Bambang said the “prize will give me more power” to push back against these companies and expose their actions.“I almost couldn’t believe that I’m receiving this award in London because it feels like a dream to me,” Bambang told Mongabay. “Praise be to God, the panel of judges saw my consistency in using scientific evidence for nearly 20 years, which shows the huge role that science plays in uncovering [forest fires].”He said receiving the award was even more surprising to him because only last year he was sued by an oil palm company, PT Jatim Jaya Perkasa (JJP), for 510 billion rupiah ($36.3 million) after he testified against its practices in court. Bambang’s testimony led to the oil palm firm being ordered by a court to pay 491 billion rupiah ($34.8 million) in fines and restoration fees for fires that occurred on its concession.The company subsequently filed a lawsuit against Bambang, but not over the substance of his testimony. Rather, it was a quibble over a technicality: the company said Bambang’s evidence was inadmissible because it used the letterheads of both his university and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (which had commissioned Bambang to carry out a forensic investigation of the fire). The lawsuit was later dismissed.At the time, Bambang, who has weathered a flurry of similar lawsuits throughout his career, said he “won’t back off, not even one step, because there are already many cases waiting for me.”It was this determination to get to the bottom of each case in the face of constant threats that won over the judges of the John Maddox Prize.“Bambang Hero Saharjo stood out to the judges for his decision to dedicate his life to the difficult task of communicating sound science and evidence in many forums, ensuring that communities have access to and understand this evidence and they can use it to safeguard their health and their environment,” said Tracey Brown, the director of Sense about Science and one of the judges.Fellow judge Martin Rees, a British cosmologist and astrophysicist from the University of Cambridge, called Bambang’s work pivotal to protecting Indonesia’s rainforests.“Rain forests are under threat, but their preservation matters to all of us who care about climate and biodiversity,” he said. “So it’s right that we should acclaim a man who seized the chance to really make a difference — by persistent and effective campaigning against powerful interests.”The judges awarded a further prize, for exceptional communication of evidence by someone early in their career, to Olivier Bernard, a Canadian pharmacist who stood up against alternative-health proponents pushing for high-dose vitamin C injections for cancer patients — a treatment with no basis in evidence.“Olivier spoke out repeatedly, describing the scientific evidence and speaking directly to politicians and affected groups,” Sense about Science said in its statement. “He endured a campaign of harassment, including complaints to his employer and professional body, revealing the address of the pharmacy where he works, a smear campaign, calls for a boycott of his wife’s books, as well as death threats to him and his family.”Bambang Hero Saharjo, second from right, and Oliver Bernard, second from left, pose together after accepting the 2019 John Maddox Prize in London. Image courtesy of Bambang Hero Saharjo.Brown said both both Bambang and Oliver exemplified the spirit of the Maddox Prize as they stood up for the rights of fellow citizens.“They saw the easier path of silence or complicity and rejected it to take responsibility for communicating evidence,” she said. “Our winners are an example of what can be achieved by one person, standing up against misinformation and corruption.” Activism, Climate Change, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Haze, Law, Law Enforcement, Peatlands, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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LIKE SHIPS PASSING IN THE NIGHT…..2 GIANT CRUISERS OFF DONEGAL COAST

first_imgTHIS was the moment which showed that, just perhaps, we’re not the totally forgotten county anymore….as more tourists come to see us.Visiting Killybegs was the Saga Saphire, 200m long transiting to BelfastAt Moville was the Crystal Symphony at 240m long and destined for Galway. The two ships passed each other off the Donegal coast south west of Gola Island last evening.The photographs were taken with Donegal Airport and Carrickfinn Blue Flag Beach in the foreground; Inishfree Island to the left and Gola Island on the right.The Saga Saphire appears larger (closer) and is travelling from left to right.Danny McFadden was there for Donegal Daily to catch these beautiful pictures.  LIKE SHIPS PASSING IN THE NIGHT…..2 GIANT CRUISERS OFF DONEGAL COAST was last modified: August 27th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:carrickfincruise shipsdonegalGolaKillybegsmovillelast_img read more

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Half-time: Chelsea 2 Juventus 1

first_imgTwo goals in as many minutes by Oscar put the holders in a commanding position in their opening Champions League group match.The Brazilian, making his first start for Chelsea, opened the scoring just after the half-hour mark with a 25-yard shot which took a deflection off Juventus’ Leonardo Bonucci.But there was nothing fortuitous about Oscar’s superb second goal. After being found by Ashley Cole’s pass, he squirmed away from Andrea Barzagli and Giorgio Chiellini before brilliantly firing beyond keeper Gianluigi Buffon and into the top corner.Juve, unbeaten in 42 Serie A games, halved the deficit eight minutes before the interval.Claudio Marchisio – who had earlier been denied by keeper Petr Cech – found space near the edge of the penalty area and set up Arturo Vidal, whose shot went through David Luiz’s legs and into the net.Chelsea (4-2-3-1): Cech; Ivanovic, Luiz, Terry, Cole; Mikel, Lampard; Ramires, Hazard, Oscar; Torres.Subs: Turnbull, Romeu, Mata, Moses, Cahill, Azpilicueta, Bertrand.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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ESPN talking head ranks the top 5 NBA duos, and the Warriors make the grade

first_imgClick here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device.These are not the dog days for the NBA. They are the dog months. The postseason is but a memory. Training camps don’t convene until around Johnny Appleseed Day.How to fill the void? Stephen A. Smith.Appearing recently on ESPN’s “First Take,” Smith, with the fervor of a carnival barker, presented a list of the top 5 duos in the NBA. Granted, it’s not Game 6 of the Western Conference  finals. But it beats the CFL Game of …last_img read more

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