New film reveals at-risk ‘uncontacted’ Awá tribe in Brazilian Amazon

first_imgA just released documentary film includes footage of an uncontacted indigenous group known as the Awá Guajá, hunter-gatherers described by NGO Survival International as the most threatened tribe on the planet. The indigenous group lives in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest in Northeast Maranhão state.The footage was captured by chance by cameraman Flay Guajajara, a member of the Mídia Índia (a collective of indigenous communicators of various ethnicities) when he and other Guajajara Indians were on a hunting trip in the Araribóia reserve, one of the country’s most threatened indigenous territories.*The Awá share the Araribóia reserve with their Guajajara relatives. In late 2012, the Guajajara set up a group who call themselves “Guardians of the Forest” and risk their lives combatting illegal logging to protect the reserve and the Awá’s lives. In August 2018, deep in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest in Northeast Maranhão state, an expedition of Guajajara indigenous people was suddenly alerted by an unexpected whistle. The sound came from an unseen group of Awá Guajá, an uncontacted group of hunter-gatherers described by NGO Survival International as the most threatened indigenous group on the planet.The Awá Guajá, which didn’t spot the Guajajara, were then captured on film by cameraman Flay Guajajara, a member of Mídia Índia — a collective of indigenous communicators of various ethnicities. The footage has been included in a 13-minute documentary film launched on July 23 in São Paulo. One sequence shows the empty Awá Guajá’s encampment with hammocks and hunting tools, as well as one member of the uncontacted group, unaware he was being filmed, smelling a machete left in the area by outsiders.Called “Ka’a Zar Ukyze Wà,” Forest Keepers in Danger, the documentary sheds light on the vulnerability of the uncontacted Awá Guajá in the Araribóia indigenous reserve, one of the country’s most threatened demarcated indigenous areas. The Awá share the Araribóia reserve with their Guajajara relatives, who established “Guardians of the Forest,” a group that risks their lives fighting illegal logging in the reserve.This film shows “our history, our life, our survival… [it] shows the invasion of loggers in Araribóia… [and] our activities to protect the lungs of the world and the Awá,” the leader of about 120 Guajajara “Guardians,” Olímpio Iwyramu Guajajara, told Mongabay.“Many people doubted [the existence of] uncontacted Awá… Now there is a proof… [But] these images were captured by chance — [The Guajajara] went hunting and didn’t know they were going to come across them… We respect their right to not have contact,” the leader explained, highlighting the importance of the film as a means of resistance against the government of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, whom he calls “anti-indigenous and anti-forest.”Screenshot of the documentary film “Ka’a Zar Ukyze Wà” — Forest Keepers in Danger — showing a member of the Awá Guajá Awá Guajá ‘uncontacted’ tribe smelling a machete left in the area by outsiders, unaware he was being filmedScreenshot of the documentary film “Ka’a Zar Ukyze Wà” — Forest Keepers in Danger — showing an Awá Guajá’s encampment with hammocks and hunting toolsSince Bolsonaro took office at the start of the year, he has announced controversial policies, including plans to open up indigenous reserves for large-scale mining and agribusiness, as well as measures to weaken environmental regulations and agencies. Although most of these policies have yet to be implemented, some critics say that Bolsonaro’s election pushed illegal loggers and land grabbers to encroach on indigenous lands and clear trees in the Amazon, for which there is some hard evidence.Official estimates from the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE) for 2019 annual deforestation only will be released at the end of the year, but the agency’s alert systems detected a cleared area of 5,048 square kilometers (1,949 square miles) for the 12 months ending June 30, 2019, an increase of about 12.5 percent over the prior year in Legal Amazonia, a federal designation that includes all or parts of nine Brazilian states.In the last ten months, a monthly average of 517 deforestation alerts, and more than 1,200 kilometers (745 miles) of illegal logging trails were detected in Araribóia by the alert monitoring system of NGO Socio-environmental Institute (ISA).“The situation at Araribóia worsened during this government. This year, the Guardians carried out about ten operations against illegal loggers… [W]e set fire to all illegal logging camps we found,” Olímpio said, adding that the loggers fled and there has never been a conflict during the Guardians’ patrols.Olímpio Iwyramu Guajajara, the leader of the “Guardians of the Forest,” poses for a photo in front of the Arariboia sign that is all engraved by bullet marks, in Maranhão state, on Jan 30, 2019. Image by Karla Mendes/MongabayThe Guardians group was set up in late 2012 and has destroyed some 200 illegal logging camps, according to Olímpio. He said he is hopeful that the new film will raise global awareness of the Awá’s precarious situation and may help the Guardians to get financial support to set up an NGO and a website for receiving donations aimed at protecting the Araribóia territory.“Guardians of the Forest,” a group of Guajajara indigenous people that risks their lives fighting illegal logging in the Araribóia indigenous reserve, in Maranhão state, on Jan 31, 2019. Image by Karla Mendes/Mongabay“These people, whose image were captured, were frightened by this close approach. This demonstrates the degree of vulnerability and threat they are experiencing. How [is it possible that] some people have the courage to say that indigenous people today are prepared to live without their home, without their territory?” said Sônia Guajajara, the leader of the Articulação dos Povos Indígenas do Brasil, the National Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB), in a statement featured in the documentary.As Flay Guajajara finished his filming of the uncontacted group, he allowed the Awá to see him briefly so they could both share “the image of each other.”“Will we see each other again?” he asks in the film, leaving the question unanswered. Analysts fear that the rapid advancement of Brazil’s so-called “Arc of Deforestation” will destroy the homelands of the Amazon’s last uncontacted peoples.The documentary ends with a Guajajara song about the Awá: “In the middle of the forest, they are there… the Wazayzar hehe… They belong to the forest, they belong to the forest. In the middle of the forest, they are there.”The film was directed by Flay in partnership with Erisvan Bone Guajajara and Edivan dos Santos Guajajara, fellow members of Mídia Índia. The documentary, which was released on Youtube on July 24 with subtitles in English, Spanish and Indonesian Bahasa, was produced by Mídia Índia, ISA and Instituto Catitu, a non-profit association.Banner image caption: Screenshot of the documentary film “Ka’a Zar Ukyze Wà” — Forest Keepers in Danger — showing a member of the Awá Guajá ‘uncontacted’ tribeFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Karla Mendescenter_img Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Corruption, Culture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People last_img read more

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Campaigners push for reform of outdated CITES wildlife trade system

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored CITES, the international treaty that regulates the trade in wildlife products, dates back to 1975, but some of the systems it uses have not changed in that time.Campaigners say this lack of modernization has allowed the illegal wildlife trade to proliferate to the tune of more than $250 billion a year.Better regulation would reduce the scale of the illegal wildlife trade and ensure legal commerce is truly sustainable, they say. Groundbreaking reforms to the $320 billion legal wildlife trade are being put up for discussion at a major international conference this month as campaigners seek to modernize a system they say hasn’t changed in nearly 50 years.Trade in everything from rhino horn and elephant ivory to python skins, wild orchids and timber is regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), a treaty dating back to 1975 and backed by more than 180 countries around the world.But campaigners say that the way in which CITES manages the global wildlife trade has not been updated since it was first set up. In particular, it still relies on a paper-based permit system that does not integrate with international customs protocols, leading to a lack of transparency and traceability in the industry.In addition, the basis on which CITES operates — to list those species for which trade is limited or banned completely — is the opposite of many other industries, campaigners say. It should be reversed, they contend, so that those only those species in which trade is permitted are listed, and those wishing to profit from the trade must demonstrate that it is sustainable.Pair of orphaned elephant calves at a rescue center in Kenya. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Lynn Johnson is the CEO and founder of the Australia-based nonprofit Nature Needs More, which initially looked at the illegal trade in wildlife products and quickly realized there were many fundamental loopholes and flaws in the legal system that needed addressing first.“We started to look at all the research that had been done, and the two major pieces of work we found was one study that showed that only 7.3 percent of CITES permits were discrepancy-free, and research published this year which showed that it took an average of 12 years for a species listed on the IUCN Red List and therefore at risk of extinction to be regulated under CITES,” Johnson said.Discrepancies in the permit system could be as simple as officials not recording how many of a particular item are being exported, according to Peter Lanius, a co-director of Nature Needs More. “Most of these permits are filled in by hand, and the people doing it lack the training or the knowledge to do it properly,” he said.Johnson and Lanius say the permit system is so antiquated that it allows the illegal wildlife trade to flourish; the latest figure for the scale of this trade is $258 billion a year. They say that since 2010, CITES and the signatory countries have discussed creating a wholly electronic system that is fully integrated with customs, at a cost of an estimated $40 million. To date no one has been prepared to fund it.Sumatran elephants in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem, one of the region’s last great swaths of intact rainforest. Rapid oil palm expansion is eating away at the creatures’ habitat and driving them into increased conflict with humans. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayConservation groups, which attend CITES conferences but in a non-voting capacity, have not given the Nature Needs More campaign their whole-hearted support, say experts. Shruti Suresh, the senior wildlife campaigner for the U.K.-based Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), described this year’s CITES conference as a “critical opportunity” to increase protection for species threatened by the wildlife trade.“While CITES does have its shortcomings, it is currently the primary internationally binding treaty dedicated to addressing trade in animal and plant species of concern,” she said, “and we need to ensure that the precautionary approach is at the heart of any changes to the CITES framework.”Mark Jones, head of policy for the U.K.-based Born Free Foundation, said that although the wildlife trade continued to devastate the welfare of individual animals and the conservation of many species, CITES was a vital tool for reducing its impact.“The current systems for regulating and managing wildlife trade are clearly failing to protect wildlife and biodiversity across the globe,” Jones added.Decisions made by governments at CITES should not serve the commercial interests of traders, he said. “To this end, we fully support any measures aimed at reducing wildlife trade and improving associated monitoring and law enforcement processes through CITES and other mechanisms.”The critically endangered Sumatran tiger. The peat forests of the Kampar Peninsula is one of its last strongholds. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerJohnson said conservation NGOs tend to be focused on the protection of individual species, rather than how the system works as a whole.“A lot of individuals in the larger NGOs said to us, ‘We are only at the working group meetings by grace and favor of signatory countries. If we challenge them too much, we [could be] uninvited, and if we are uninvited, that impacts on our donor-funding opportunities.’”According to Nature Needs More, creating a better regulated legal wildlife trade could have huge knock-on impacts on the illegal one.“We have looked at different types of industries, from pharmaceuticals to airlines parts, and speaking to people, there is an expectation that [the trade in] illicit products stays under 10 percent if you have a system that is well regulated,” Johnson said. “But when you are talking about the illicit trade in endangered species being up to $260 billion, then you are talking 80 percent of the legal trade.”If a figure of 10 percent were attained, then the illegal wildlife trade would be reduced from one worth an estimated $260 bn to £32bn a year.Donalea Patman, CEO and founder of For the Love of Wildlife, which is partnering with Nature Needs More in efforts to modernize CITES, said there was a lack of investment in wildlife-trade regulations in general. Some 36,000 species are listed by CITES, but Patman says Australian customs officials get three hours’ training in how to identify all of them.Pileated gibbons are easy to hunt because of their singing in the rainforest canopy. They are poached as bushmeat in Thailand’s Thap Lan National Park by poachers who feed on them while cutting Endangered rosewood trees. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay“When it comes to ivory, auction houses and antique stores tell their clients that if they want to take ivory out of the country, just to say it’s resin or camel bone, because the customs guys don’t know how to be identify it,” she said. “Customs officials also say that, even if they confiscate some items, it is never reported because it is not a priority. They are looking for drugs or firearms, and wildlife products are only found because they are looking for other things, so it is incidental.”Johnson said it was time, at least for now, to put the argument about whether we should be trading in wildlife at all to one side. “We’ve had this ideological debate of pro-trade versus no-trade, so let’s … accept the fact there will be trade and let’s just fix it,” she said. “If we have to have it — and it’s definitely the model of choice right now — then at least let’s fix it.”The reform proposals have to be put forward by one of the signatory countries at the CITES conference, which will be held in Geneva from Aug. 17 to 28, and Johnson and Patman said they would like it to be a range-state one (in Africa or Asia, for example). They said the Australian government has expressed its support, as has the EU.Mongabay contacted the CITES Secretariat for comment, but did not receive any response as of the time this article was published.Banner image: Rhinos enjoying a mud wallow at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.About the reporter: James Fair is a wildlife conservation and environmental journalist based in England. You can find him on Twitter at @Jamesfairwild. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Cites, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered, Endangered Species, Forests, Governance, Rainforests, Tracking, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

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ESPN talking head ranks the top 5 NBA duos, and the Warriors make the grade

first_imgClick here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device.These are not the dog days for the NBA. They are the dog months. The postseason is but a memory. Training camps don’t convene until around Johnny Appleseed Day.How to fill the void? Stephen A. Smith.Appearing recently on ESPN’s “First Take,” Smith, with the fervor of a carnival barker, presented a list of the top 5 duos in the NBA. Granted, it’s not Game 6 of the Western Conference  finals. But it beats the CFL Game of …last_img read more

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Mike Fiers’ win streak snaps, Astros rout Athletics in historic home run frenzy

first_imgHOUSTON — A raging forest fire isn’t easy to extinguish. And the A’s happened to catch the Houston Astros on a tear through dry brush.Houston was fresh off a 21-1 win over the Seattle Mariners on Sunday with the type of heat that singed into Monday’s matchup against Oakland, and all the A’s could throw at their fire was some spit.The last time Mike Fiers faced the Astros he allowed four home runs. It was a moonshot frenzy that the A’s outlasted by one run back on a rare hot, dry night in …last_img read more

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SA billionaire joins super-givers list

first_img31 January 2013 Mining magnate Patrice Motsepe, the richest black South African, has pledged to give half the income generated by his family assets to charity – becoming the first person outside the US to take the Giving Pledge started by Microsoft founder Bill Gates and billionaire Warren Buffett. Making the announcement at a press conference in Johannesburg on Wednesday, Motsepe, the founder and executive chairman of African Rainbow Minerals, said the Motsepe family “will contribute at least half of the funds generated by our family assets to the Motsepe Foundation … to improve the lifestyles and living conditions of poor, disabled, unemployed, women, youth, workers and marginalised South Africans”. Forbes Magazine has estimated Motsepe to be worth about US2.65-billion (R24-billion).South Africans ‘are compassionate people’ Motsepe, describing South Africans as “caring, compassionate and loving people”, said “it has always been part of our culture and tradition to assist and care for less fortunate and marginalised members of our communities. This culture is also embodied in the spirit and tradition of ubuntu/botho.” He said that he and his wife, Precious, had also been inspired by, and had decided to join, the Giving Pledge, which encourages wealthy families worldwide to give at least half of their wealth to charity. “Precious and I recognise the huge responsibility and duty that the Motsepe family has to poor, unemployed, disabled, women, youth, workers and marginalised South Africans. We also have an ongoing obligation of nation building, uniting black and white South Africans, and contributing towards making South Africa, Africa and the world a better place.” The money will be handled by the Motsepe Foundation, established by Motsepe and his wife in 1999 to oversee their philanthropic initiatives. To help guide the foundation, Motsepe said he and his wife would be setting up an advisory council comprising religious leaders as well as “traditional, disabled, women, youth and labour leaders and other respected NGO and community upliftment leaders”. The Motsepe Foundation would “continue to focus on initiatives and projects which will assist the beneficiaries to become self-sustaining and independent”.Setting an example Most of their donations had up till now been private, Motsepe said, “but the need and challenges are great, and we hope that our Giving Pledge will encourage others in South Africa, Africa and other emerging economies to give and make the world a better place. “We will continue to work with and encourage governments on the African continent to implement fiscal, legislative, anti-corruption and other measures to ensure that their economies are globally competitive and attractive to private sector and other business investments”, Motsepe added. “Economies that are growing and have ethical and accountable political, business and other leaders are better positioned and substantially more effective in dealing with poverty, joblessness, illiteracy and disease.”Thanks to Buffett, Gates Motsepe expressed his gratitude to Buffett “for the advice and wisdom he shared with me in Omaha during August 2012 and for inspiring thousands of people worldwide to give and care for the less fortunate. “We would also like to thank Bill and Melinda Gates for their encouragement and for providing us with additional information on the Giving Pledge at our meeting in Cape Town during December 2012. Their work in Africa and other continents and their commitment to humanity continues to inspire us and many people throughout the world. “Our culture, religious upbringing and values guided and influenced us in making this commitment, and we are proud that our children support our pledge”, Motsepe said. “Their future and the future of all South Africans requires us to give hope and build a better and brighter future for all our people.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Nadal vs Djokovic: Djokovic wins Wimbledon title

first_imgNovad Djokovic teased and tormented Rafael Nadal for a full two hours and 28 minutes on Centre Court as he won 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3 to become the new king of grass at Wimbledon. PhotosAs Nadal slammed an uncharacteristic backhand error to lose The Championships point, Djokovic hit the deck in sheer joy on Sunday. Within minutes, the 24-year-old Serbian did what no champion had ever done before — plucked a few blades of the grass and chewed it.Former claycourt  champion Manuel Santana, who had during his playing days remarked “grass is for cows” was puzzled by this impromptu action from Djokovic as he ended the Roger Federer-Nadal duopoly at Wimbledon.”This is the best day of my life, this is the tournament I always dreamt of winning,” said Djokovic following the presentation ceremony. He hugged the trophy the same way as a child would do with a prized new toy.”When you are playing the best player in the world, Rafa Nadal, I had to play at the top of my game. I think I played my best match on grass,” said an emotional Djokovic as his entire family and support staff watched with moist eyes.When the new weekly ATP rankings come out on Monday, Djokovic will officially be the No.1 men’s singles player. But the icing on the cake is the Wimbledon trophy, which has come in a year where his dominance has been supreme, having won the Australian Open title in January.For his part, Nadal was emotional when he first addressed the centre court. “Wimbledon has always been special for me and I can imagine how Novak is feeling today. I wish to thank the crowds for making me feel like this and I will be back next year,” said Nadal, his voice almost choking.advertisementThis is the Wimbledon final which everyone had been hoping for – No.1 versus the No. 2. Statistical records in this season were in favour of  Djokovic, though given Nadal’s unbeaten 20-match winning streak at The Championships, it would have required something special for the Serbian to pull it off.And what a start Djokovic made, going full throttle and playing sublime tennis where the timings of his shots mixed with the angles and superb court coverage caught the eye.The high first serve percentage worked well for the six feet and two inches tall Djokovic as the defending champion was befuddled in the contest.Djokovic was on cruise mode in the second set and his game was a combination of technical acumen, consistency and immense athleticism. His court coverage and speed made him look even more destructive against a man who had won two finals before this here.There was a huge slump in Djokovic’s form in the third set and it had to do with his first serve percentage dropping. All of a sudden, the “Come on Rafa” chants grew, and the Spaniard forced the contest into the fourth set.The longer the match grew, it would have been better for Nadal, as he usually wears down the opponent with his termagant approach. But Djokovic had other ideas as he once again started playing in the zone. His production of groundstrokes was amazing and the backhand absolutely world class.Yet, the way the new champion asserted himself in the eighth game of the fourth set and forced Nadal to make errors was something unusual.Serving for the title, Djokovic was composed. Referred to as a player who can hit winners from any part of the court he set up match point with an immaculate high backhand volley. Nadal needed to do something special to hang in and failed.Each era of Wimbledon has seen special champions. After Pete Sampras won his seventh title here in 2000, wild card Goran Ivanisevic won The Championships in 2001. A year later, when the entire field fell apart, Lleyton Hewitt emerged champion.From 2003 to 2010, it has been a Federer vs Nadal show. Djokovic has signaled the dawn of a new era and more rivalries will take shape from here on. As the 125th edition of the Wimbledon came to a close, it is nice to have two new champions — Petra Kvitova from the Czech Republic and Novad Djokovic from Belgrade, Serbia.last_img read more

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CCTV to Assist Policing in Montego Bay

first_imgStory Highlights The system consists of some 19 cameras strategically located across the city The Area One police now have improved watch over the city of Montego Bay, with the official acquisition of a Closed Circuit Television Surveillance System on Thursday, September 5.Minister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting, handed over an access swipe card to the control centre for the system, to Assistant Commissioner of Police in charge of Area One, Warren Clarke, during a ceremony held at the Montego Freeport Police Station.The system, consisting of some 19 cameras strategically located across the city, was procured by the Ministry at a cost of approximately $55 million.In his address Minister Bunting pointed out that six more cameras are to be added to the system shortly, with the assistance of the private sector.  “We are expecting that this is going to have a further positive impact on crime reduction in the areas where these cameras are installed,” he stated.Mr. Bunting noted that “The first (benefit) (is that) it would improve our detection, and because these cameras are being monitored twenty four seven, so we would be able to identify crimes in progress and dispatch teams to address that”. He said the cameras would provide useful evidence, and act as a deterrent.The National Security Minister argued that the project had been highly anticipated, adding that the 19 cameras are just a start, to be improved over time to an ideal amount.     He pointed out that his Ministry is spending hundreds of millions of dollars this year to upgrade several aspects of its technological resources and intelligence gathering capabilities.“All of this will hopefully in the medium term show a significant return on that investment, in terms of making the communities across Jamaica safer and more secure, and I hope that this specific investment will contribute to keeping the streets of Montego Bay safe and secure for both citizens and visitors alike,” he stated. The system was procured by the Ministry at a cost of approximately $55 million The Area One police now have improved watch over the city of Montego Baylast_img read more

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THE COMEDY NETWORK GETS PUMPED WITH THE DEBUT OF CORNER GAS ANIMATED

first_img Facebook Login/Register With: TORONTO, Feb. 5, 2018 – As announced during last night’s SUPER BOWL LII broadcast on CTV, the much-anticipated CORNER GAS ANIMATED series comes to life on The Comedy Network beginning Monday, April 2 at 8 p.m. ET/PT. Created by and starring comedian Brent Butt, the 13-episode, half-hour reboot of the iconic Canadian series sees the return of all the beloved characters of Dog River, Saskatchewan, as they partake in new adventures in an expanded animated universe. Brent (Brent Butt), Lacey (Gabrielle Miller), Oscar (Eric Peterson), Hank (Fred Ewanuick), Davis (Lorne Cardinal), Karen (Tara Spencer-Nairn), Wanda (Nancy Robertson), and Emma (Corrine Koslo) all get a cartoon makeover in the all-new comedy.“With CORNER GAS’ built-in audience, Mondays at 8 p.m. is sure to be the next tent pole timeslot for The Comedy Network,” said Pat DiVittorio, Vice-President, CTV and Specialty Programming, Bell Media. “We know devoted fans will love this fresh take on a cherished series which is sure to be an audience-builder for the network.”“I’m excited! Comic books, cartoons, and drawing have always been in my DNA,” said Creator, Executive Producer and star Brent Butt. “The original series really lends itself to being animated. The humour, the warmth, the antics and cast have all found their way into the new animated show. It feels like CORNER GAS and I couldn’t be happier. I can’t wait to unveil CORNER GAS ANIMATED. Tune in Easter Monday!” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement .SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:Twitter: The Comedy Network on [email protected]@BrentButt – Brent [email protected] – Gabrielle [email protected] – Fred [email protected] – Lorne [email protected] – Tara Spencer [email protected] – Nancy [email protected] – Corrine [email protected] – Virginia [email protected]:Facebook.com/CornerGasOfficialThe Comedy Network on FacebookFacebook.com/Verite.Films.CanadaInstagram:@CornerGasOfficial Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Ohio State earns No 6 ranking in preseason poll

No. 3Oklahoma No. 1Alabama No. 5LSU No. 8Stanford No. 9Tennessee No. 7Michigan No. 2Clemson OSU then-redshirt somphomore quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) prepares to throw the ball during a game against Northern Illinois on Sept. 19 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won 20-13. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe preseason Associated Press college football rankings were released on Sunday pitting Ohio State at No. 6 to open the season. Earlier this month, the Amway coaches’ poll was released ranking OSU No. 5.This is the fourth straight season where OSU entered the season ranked in the top 10.There are four Big Ten teams ranked in the top 25, all within the top 20. Michigan is ranked No. 7 to open the season, just one spot behind OSU. Reigning Big Ten champion Michigan State sits at No. 12 and Big Ten West division champion Iowa Hawkeyes are at No. 17.Urban Meyer and the Buckeyes’ top-ranked opponent in 2016 comes in week three at No. 3 Oklahoma, which won the Big 12 and lost in the College Football Playoff semifinals last year.No. 6 OSU will start its season against Bowling Green at Ohio Stadium at noon on Sept. 3. No. 4Florida State No. 6Ohio State No. 10Notre Dame read more

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