In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, June 28, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update center_img There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsAkagera National Park in Rwanda took in five eastern black rhinos from European zoos and safari parks on June 24 (The Republic).Indigenous advocates say that more robust land rights for the 25 percent of the Earth’s surface in traditional territories will help in the battle against climate change (CIFOR Forests News).“Eco-fashion” helps empower Dayak communities in Indonesia (The Jakarta Post).The former part-owner of an illegal logging company re-enters Liberian politics (FrontPageAfrica).Kenya’s timber industry, which employs some 50,000 people, searches for new pathways to sustainability (Daily Nation).A “lost city” in the Honduran rainforest is home to species that were presumed to have gone extinct (The Independent, Good News Network, Yahoo News, ScienceAlert, The Sun).Drones outfitted with lidar help scientists keep an eye on deforestation in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest (DroneDJ).The people who created Peru’s Nazca lines looked to exotic bird species for inspiration (Science News).Some communities in Liberia say they haven’t seen the benefits from REDD+ (FrontPageAfrica).Satellite vegetation surveys in India aren’t effective at measuring the forage that elephants need, a study has found (The Hindu).Other newsAn air policy official at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has left his position amid questions over contacts with former clients (The Washington Post).Hawaiians are working to bring back local aquaculture techniques as a way to reduce the island state’s dependence on imported seafood (Biographic).U.S. Vice President Mike Pence goes against other government agencies, and the military, in his refusal to call climate change a threat to national security (The Guardian).The Ocean Cleanup project is taking a second stab at gathering trash from the Pacific using an experimental floating device (Associated Press).The last known individual of a native Hawaiian snail species has died, part of a worrying trend for the island’s snail species (The Atlantic).Some U.S. states have introduced far-reaching plans for dealing with climate change, while others appear to be ignoring the potential crisis completely (The New York Times).A 2012 hurricane has given the endangered piping plover a new future on Fire Island in the U.S. state of New York (The New York Times).The well-intentioned rearing of monarch butterflies, aimed at helping a species that’s declined by 80 percent in the last 10 years, could backfire, as captive-born butterflies aren’t able to migrate well (The Atlantic).A leak that’s been pumping oil and gas into the Gulf of Mexico since 2004 is “a thousand times worse” than originally thought (The New York Times).Four North Atlantic right whales were recently found dead in Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence (The New York Times).Three more gray whales have died in Alaska, increasing the toll of this year’s “unusual mortality event” (NOAA).Banner image of an invasive rosy wolf snail (Euglandina rosea) that is causing problems for Hawaii’s native snails, by Dylan Parker via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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New eDNA sampling system aims for cleaner, more efficient field research

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Researchers tested a new self-preserving filter housing system that automatically preserves eDNA from water samples, while reducing the risk of DNA contamination and plastic waste.Scientists who use eDNA currently rely on cumbersome cold storage or liquid preservatives and single-use sampling equipment to preserve their eDNA samples, which are highly sensitive to degradation as well as contamination.The new system incorporates a hydrophilic plastic material in its filter housing that physically pulls water from the sample without having to add chemicals.In a six-month test, it allowed data collectors to preserve samples quickly and easily, at ambient temperature and with far reduced plastic waste, preventing degradation for weeks and with slightly higher amounts of captured DNA than a standard method. When collecting a DNA sample from a species in the wild just isn’t possible — it’s elusive, it may disturb the animal, or a host of other reasons — field biologists often turn to collecting the next best thing: environmental DNA.Known as eDNA, it comprises genetic material shed by animals and plants into the surrounding ecosystem through their skin, scales, feces or pollen, and has proved increasingly useful for identifying particularly aquatic species found at a given place.A water sample here would contain the eDNA of these various fish species. Image by Sue Palminteri/MongabayCollecting and analyzing water or soil samples containing DNA of the organisms living in the area is quicker, easier and cheaper than traditional field DNA collection methods that require scientists to physically contact the animal or plant of interest and take a direct tissue sample from it.Challenges in using eDNAThere is, however, a major drawback to the method: the eDNA in water is often dilute, so obtaining enough DNA of the target animal from water samples requires researchers to transport substantial amounts of water to a lab for analysis, which can cause the DNA to degrade over time.To prevent degradation of the DNA during transport back to their labs, eDNA scientists tend to immediately filter out and preserve samples in the field. But the steps used in the preservation process, including transferring samples to cold storage or to ethanol or other chemical preservative, increase the risk of contamination of the DNA.To mitigate that risk, eDNA field researchers have turned to single‐use filter housings that can immediately preserve eDNA samples on‐site, without their having to transport large volumes of water.But what are sustainability-minded ecologists to do when the most effective data-collection method produces substantial plastic waste?“Most of us got into ecology because we care about the ecosystems we study,” says researcher Austen Thomas. “The last thing we want to do is leave a legacy of plastic trash.”A Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), found in wetlands in various western United States and one of two species with DNA analyzed in this study. Image by Jim Harvey, U.S. Forest Service.Thomas led a group of researchers in Washington state, U.S., who developed a reusable filter housing that uses a partially biodegradable hydrophilic plastic, rather than chemicals or cold storage, to preserve eDNA samples. The hydrophilic (“water-loving”) property of the plastic means it pulls and absorbs water from the sample. They published details on the system and the results of a comparison of the new technique with a standard, chemical-based eDNA collection process.A physical, rather than chemical, desiccant“We started out simply looking for biodegradable plastics that could be molded into a filter housing, with the objective of reducing plastic waste,” Thomas, from the Smith-Root company, which develops technology for fisheries research, said in a statement. “That’s when we realized that some of the biodegradable compounds function by being highly hydrophilic.”These compounds, the “secret” to creating a self-preserving eDNA filter, automatically preserved the collected eDNA by drying it out physically, rather than chemically. By physically pulling moisture from the sample, the desiccant material in the filter housing removed the need to use liquid chemicals and associated single-use plastic vials to preserve the eDNA.The Smith-Root eDNA Sampler’s individual self‐preserving eDNA filter housings are packaged in resealable plastic bags that work with a ziplock-type of closure and can remain closed for weeks at ambient field temperature until the team is back at the lab. The process enables field teams to collect and transport many field samples without having to carry around cold-storage materials or liquid preservatives.A team member first collects an eDNA sample from water by attaching the filter housing to a pump apparatus. A standard 47-millimeter (1.9-inch) membrane in the housing filters the water, which remains in the housing. The user then places the entire housing (still unopened) back into the resealable bag. The bag’s hydrophilic plastic then absorbs any remaining moisture in the housing container, preserving the eDNA captured on the filter membrane.To use the self-preservation filters: (1) you open a filter packet containing the pre‐loaded 47 mm inline filter housing made with hydrophilic plastic, (2) you collect and filter water through the PES membrane which is attached to a pump system, (3) you place the filter housing, unopened, back into a resealable pouch you can seal and label, (4) the hydrophilic plastic immediately begins to preserve the eDNA by desiccation at ambient temperature in field storage, (5) you can story the samples at room temperature while they await bulk processing in a lab, (6) when ready, you open the filter housing with the pull‐tab and remove the eDNA filter membrane to extract the DNA.Back in the clean conditions of a laboratory, the team opens the filter housing via a pull tab and extracts the captured eDNA from the membrane.For their study, the scientists compared the eDNA preservation capabilities of the self‐preserving hydrophilic filter housings to a standard ethanol preservation method using eDNA from two species, a New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) and a Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris). They found that the new filter housings actually resulted in more amplified eDNA of the target species (in both cases) than the industry‐standard ethanol preservation method for sample collection, though both methods kept the eDNA from degrading over a six‐month testing period. These data suggest that the new method is at least an equally effective option for preserving eDNA captured in the field and storing the samples at low cost for up to six months.Expanding the testing effortThe authors say in their paper their primary aim was to reduce the risk of eDNA contamination from handling of filters in the field and support the integration of eDNA into management or regulatory processes. By removing steps from the DNA preservation process, they suggest, the new system should enable field researchers to collect their samples in less time while using fewer forceps, buffers, vials, coolers and other materials.A New England mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), the eDNA of which was analyzed in this study. Image by Michal Maňas via Wikimedia Commons, CC 4.0.“This really simplifies the eDNA sample collection process,” co-author Caren Goldberg, from Washington State University, said in the statement. “It also reduces the amount of time and training required for field staff to effectively collect eDNA samples.”Streamlining the eDNA field sampling process, the researchers write in their paper, should help incorporate the efforts of non-expert (citizen scientist) data collectors into research programs. Some eDNA research studies already rely on citizen scientists and others who are new to the field or not professionally trained in field data collection.To test the self-preserving filters across a broader range of locations and field conditions, the system’s developers have begun sending samples of the filters to eDNA researchers in various geographic regions. They encourage research groups interested in beta testing the new filters to contact them.CitationThomas, A. C., Howard, J., Nguyen, P. L., Seimon, T. A., & Goldberg, C. S. (2018). ANDe™: A fully integrated environmental DNA sampling system. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 9(6), 1379-1385. doi:10.1111/2041-210x.12994 Animals, DNA, Fish, Freshwater Animals, Frogs, Invertebrates, Marine Animals, Monitoring, Oceans, Research, Surveying, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Slight warming could be enough to heighten risk of malaria: Study

first_imgNew research has found that malaria parasites need less time to develop at lower temperatures than previously thought.Earlier research postulated that malaria transmission in cooler areas was unlikely because parasites took longer to mature than the lifespans of their mosquito hosts.The researchers found that the parasites needed between 31 and 37 days to develop at 18 degrees Celsius (64 degrees Fahrenheit) — substantially lower than the 56 days postulated by previous research and well within the lifespan of female mosquitoes. Climate change could shift the calculus for reining in malaria, according to new research that suggests that infectious parasites can develop in mosquitoes more quickly at lower temperatures than scientists once thought.“Our study is the first since the 1930s to investigate the relationship between temperature and malaria parasite development,” Matthew Thomas, a professor of ecological entomology at Pennsylvania State University and one of the paper’s co-authors, said in a statement. That early research has guided scientists for decades, despite the fact that it rested on findings from a species of mosquito from Russia, which sits well outside the malaria-endemic tropics and subtropics.“Our results challenge this long-standing model in malaria biology,” Thomas added.A microscope view of the midgut of an A. stephensi mosquito infected with malaria parasites (the round circles). The researchers found that malaria parasites develop faster in mosquitoes at lower temperatures than previously thought. Image and caption courtesy of Penn State.Thomas and his colleagues, in a study published June 26 in the journal Biology Letters, focused their investigations on two species of mosquitos: Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles gambiae. A. stephensi and A. gambiae — actually a group, or “complex,” of nearly identical species — wreak havoc on human populations throughout their ranges in Asia and tropical Africa, passing along developed spores in their saliva.The “long-standing model” holds that parasites need nearly two months to mature at temperatures of 18 degrees Celsius (64 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s butting right up against the lifespan of mosquitoes, making it unlikely that parasite-carrying mosquitoes will live long enough to slip the spores into a new host at this temperature — at least according to that old scenario.Thomas’s team noted that the previous studies buttressing the trusted model had issues: Some didn’t have a control group to compare parasite development rates to those at a more balmy 27 degrees Celsius (81 degrees Fahrenheit). Or, they didn’t use Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the deadliest form of malaria.An A. gambiae mosquito. Image by James D. Gathany/CDC via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).So Thomas and his colleagues exposed groups of mosquitoes to a single temperature between 16 and 20 degrees Celsius (61 and 68 degrees Fahrenheit), along with a control group at 27 degrees Celsius, at which malaria transmission typically peaks. They also varied the temperatures for other experimental groups by 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) in either direction, mimicking the range of temperatures that mosquitoes in the wild experience on a daily basis.They found that the parasites needed between 31 and 37 days to develop at a constant 18 degrees Celsius — substantially lower than the 56 days postulated by previous research and well within the lifespan of female mosquitoes. (Hard-charging male mosquitoes often don’t last more than 10 days, and they don’t bite humans anyway.) When the temperatures varied between 18 and 23 degrees Celsius (64 and 73 degrees Fahrenheit), the time was even shorter at as few as 26 days.“Our work shows that even small increases in temperature could dramatically increase malaria infections in humans because the parasites develop much faster at these lower temperatures than has been previously estimated,” Jessica Waite, the study’s lead author and an infectious disease biologist at Penn State, said in the statement.An A. stephensi mosquito obtaining a blood meal from a human host through its pointed proboscis. Image by James D. Gathany/CDC via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).Though it’s difficult to forecast just how climate change will alter places like the high-altitude plains of East Africa, this research demonstrates that bumping up highland temperatures could put millions of people around the world at risk of contracting malaria.“As temperatures increase with climate change, infectious mosquitoes in areas surrounding mountains, for example, may be able to transmit the parasite higher up the mountains than they have in the past,” Waite said.Banner image of A. stephensi mosquito by James D. Gathany/CDC via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain). Citation:Waite, J. L., Suh, E., Lynch, P. A., & Thomas, M. B. (2019). Exploring the lower thermal limits for development of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Biology Letters, 15(6), 20190275. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2019.0275FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Modeling, Climate Science, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Health, Impact Of Climate Change, Insects, Mosquitoes, Nature And Health, Parasites, Public Health, Research, Wildlife center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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In Nigeria, a highway threatens community and conservation interests

first_imgActivists and affected communities in Nigeria’s Cross River state continue to protest plans to build a major highway cutting through farmland and forest that’s home to threatened species such as the Cross River gorilla.The federal government ordered a slew of measures to minimize the impact of the project, but two years later it remains unclear whether the developers have complied, even as they resume work.Environmentalists warn of a “Pandora’s box” of problems ushered in by the construction of the highway, including illegal deforestation, poaching, land grabs, micro-climate change, erosion, biodiversity loss and encroachment into protected areas.They’ve called on the state government to pursue alternatives to the new highway, including investing in upgrading existing road networks. OKUNI, Nigeria — The bulldozers returned to the forests of Cross River state in southeastern Nigeria in January. Their metal blades resumed tearing down rainforest, rubber and cocoa plantations, homes and farms to make way for a six-lane superhighway, dispossessing thousands of villagers and threatening precious habitat for endangered species along the route.The original route, proposed by Cross River Governor Ben Ayade in 2015, would have slashed more than 100 kilometers (60 miles) through intact forest. Half of this length was to have run through a national park sheltering the critically endangered Cross River gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli); the proposal claimed an astonishing 20–kilometer (12-mile) buffer on either side of the route.The original superhighway route would have run through 115 kilometers (71 miles) of forest inside the national park and nearby community-controlled forests. Map courtesy of WCSEnvironmentalists, NGOs and local communities have fiercely resisted the project, launching a series of legal challenges and numerous petitions to state and national authorities.Environmental impact assessments for the project have been rejected three times by Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Environment for failing to meet required standards; the assessments have been found to be comprehensively inadequate — missing baseline data, engineering specifications, and required environmental safeguards — as well as failing to properly consult affected communities.In July 2017, the ministry mandated the state government to reduce the buffer to 70 meters (230 feet), and to reroute the road away from the boundaries of the national park and community forests, among dozens of other conditions. The ministry also called for concrete plans for resettlement and livelihood restoration for affected villagers, and mitigation of potential negative impacts on biodiversity.Compliance with these requirements should have been published for public scrutiny before work at the site resumed this year.If this work has been done, none of it has been made public, though the road’s route is understood to have been changed to avoid driving through the heart of Cross River National Park.Nor has Governor Ayade’s administration clarified where funding for the project will come from. In February, Ayade’s administration wrote to the state assembly seeking approval for a massive loan of 648.87 billion naira ($1.8 billion) to fund the new highway.More than 1,500 plant species are found in the park, of which 77 are endangered. Besides the namesake gorilla, fewer than 300 of which are believed to remain in the wild, the region is also home to forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), pangolins, slender-snouted crocodiles (Mecistops cataphractus), and primates including the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti), drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus), and Preuss’s red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus preussi), which is found only in the park’s Oban division and just across the border in Cameroon’s Korup National Park.last_img read more

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The Pan Borneo Highway could divide threatened wildlife populations

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Crews are set to begin construction on a stretch of Malaysia’s Pan Borneo Highway in eastern Sabah state, involving the widening of the road from two lanes to four.The new divided highway will cross the Kinabatangan River and pass through a critical wildlife sanctuary that’s home to orangutans, elephants and proboscis monkeys, along with other wildlife species already hemmed in by the region’s oil palm plantations.Planners and politicians hope the road will stimulate local economies and bring in more tourists.Conservationists and scientists, however, are concerned that the highway could further section off animal populations and damage the current tourism infrastructure, unless certain mitigation measures are introduced. This is the fourth article in our six-part series “Traveling the Pan Borneo Highway.” Read Part One, Part Two and Part Three.BATU PUTEH, Malaysia — They call it the “corridor of life.” Amid a sea of oil palm plantations, narrow strips of forests that fringe the Kinabatangan River in Malaysia teem with iconic wildlife.Established as a wildlife reserve in the 1990s, the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary has become one of the biggest tourist draws in the state of Sabah, in part because there are few places where it’s easier to see some of Southeast Asia’s best-known wild animals. Pot-bellied proboscis monkeys and eight species of hornbills are so easy to spot that tour boats from the outfitters based around the towns of Sukau and Batu Puteh sometimes won’t even slow down for them. And chance encounters with orangutans, crocodiles (observed safely from longboats) and even Borneo’s diminutive variant of the Asian elephant certainly aren’t rare.A map of the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary at the entrance to the town of Batu Puteh in Sabah, where the local tourism cooperative KOPEL is located. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Still, state and local leaders see the area’s potential for tourism as largely unrealized. Like politicians in other parts of Sabah, they aim to bring in more visitors, and provide locals with better access to services and markets, by improving connections to other parts of Sabah — specifically with the Pan Borneo Highway project. It calls for crews to widen the two-lane road that crosses the Kinabatangan River on its way from Lahad Datu to Sandakan into a four-lane, divided highway. The project plans also include a four-lane bridge over the Kinabatangan River where it crosses at the town of Batu Puteh. Currently, a two-lane, steel trestle bridge spans the river, clanking and shuddering under the weight of passing traffic, especially the ubiquitous palm oil-toting tankers.Scientists and conservation groups, however, have raised concerns about expanding the existing road, which they say could further carve up already fragmented wildlife populations. Even at two lanes, the road has proven an insurmountable impediment to elephants crossing back and forth. All of the tracking data from teams at WWF-Malaysia and the Danau Girang Field Centre just downriver show that elephants remain on one side of the road and that they won’t cross.Tourists frequently spot Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) on the Kinabatangan River. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.There’s even some evidence that the noise from the road — or perhaps, more accurately, the vibration of the bridge — keeps crocodiles from swimming underneath it, so its construction in the late 1990s likely split the river’s crocodile population in two.Experts fear that a wider, divided road would further hinder the passage of wildlife, hemming them into even smaller patches of habitat. It also increases the chances that frustrated animals will come into contact with local residents and oil palm plantation workers. They caution that the frequency of roadkill could spike, with disastrous consequences for both animals and people. One video shows a panicked and confused baby elephant bumping into cars in other parts of Sabah. In Thailand, passers-by recorded a devastating nighttime crash involving a bus and an elephant — a scene that those concerned about the arrival of the Pan Borneo Highway believe could happen in Sabah.Under the existing bridge on the north bank of the river in Batu Puteh sits the headquarters of KOPEL, an internationally recognized tourism cooperative. Households throughout the community participate, hosting travelers in homestays and benefiting financially, while the tourists have easy access to the river’s wildlife delights. KOPEL also runs an “Eco Camp” downriver for more adventurous visitors, anchored by a steady stream of school groups, looking to spend their nights in the forest. There, they also have the chance to participate in the restoration of forest throughout the wildlife sanctuary. The organization’s leaders are concerned, however, that any realignment of the existing bridge could force KOPEL to make a costly move.Expansion and realignment of the Batu Puteh bridge for the Pan Borneo Highway could force KOPEL, a local tourism cooperative, to move its headquarters. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Downriver, plans for a bridge linking the town of Sukau with more remote communities east of the river have been revived, even though the previous state government abandoned a similar project in 2017. The Sukau bridge project isn’t part of the Pan Borneo Highway, though longtime proponents echo similar claims that it would bring development, tourism and better access to health care for local residents. Curiously, though, the environmental impact assessment for the project only includes plans for road construction, not a bridge, according to several sources, even though the word “bridge” remains in the title.WWF-Malaysia has also had a chance to review the assessment. The group cautions that, “A road built in this area will cause further fragmentation and open up access to illegal wildlife hunting.” As a result, WWF-Malaysia has called for the assessment to include a study on how road construction in this area will affect wildlife.Minister of Works Baru Bian said that his office backs the construction of wildlife crossings, pointing to their inclusion in parts of Peninsular Malaysia’s Central Spine Road. Baru said that eco-viaducts there allow large animals to pass underneath the roads without posing a danger to them or to motorists.Young trees grow at a forest restoration site, providing a buffer between the oil palm plantation behind and the Kinabatangan River. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.But research in Peninsular Malaysia has shown that these pinch points serve as ideal spots for natural predators as well as poachers to hang out in search of their prey. To deal with that threat, more wildlife rangers will be needed to keep poachers at bay, Sheelasheena Damian, a policy analyst at WWF-Malaysia, told Mongabay.“The development of roads in Kinabatangan can have detrimental effects to wildlife as it creates access for poachers to enter forest reserves,” Damian said. “The government must take this into consideration when planning development in biodiversity hotspots such as Kinabatangan.”Just recently, the tusks of five Bornean elephants, almost certainly victims of poaching in Sabah, turned up across the border in the Indonesian province of North Kalimantan.The proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) is one of several threatened species protected by the wildlife sanctuary. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Biologist Benoît Goossens, who directs the Danau Girang Field Centre, agrees that wildlife viaducts aren’t a panacea.He and his colleagues have been using drones to map potential sites for the pathways once the road is in place. Imperative, he says, is that they link sections of good forest on both sides of the road, as prior research has shown. He also posits that ecobridges made to be as natural as possible might be more successful than underpasses, which are typically just dirt pathways without vegetation running under the road.Any connectivity in wildlife populations rests on the contingency that animals actually use such corridors, which is by no means guaranteed.Long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) feeding along the Kinabatangan River. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Still, at this point, with construction set to move forward, Goossens acknowledged that including some sort of wildlife crossing is the best they can hope for in terms of minimizing the impacts of the highway.“It’s that or nothing,” he said. The alternative — a four-lane, divided highway that cuts through this critical slice of habitat in Sabah without any concessions for the region’s animals — is stark.“You can say goodbye to the ‘corridor of life’ in the Kinabatangan,” Goossens said.Continue to Part Five.Banner image of a saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) in the Kinabatangan River by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest Destruction, Forest Fragmentation, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Fragmentation, Green, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Monkeys, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Palm Oil And Biodiversity, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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Audio: Humpback whales across the Pacific Ocean are singing the same song

first_imgTogether with colleagues around the world, Darling, a marine biologist with the Hawaii-based NGO Whale Trust, recorded humpback whale songs over the course of three breeding seasons at sites across the Pacific: in the Philippines, Japan, Hawai‘i, and Mexico. The researchers found that those songs can be incredibly similar to each other — nearly identical, in fact. That means that our view of the whales as living in distinct groups might very well be wrong. And that view dictates a lot of the conservation measures we’ve designed to protect imperiled populations of humpbacks.Darling joins us today to talk about his humpback research and play us some of those recordings so you can hear the similarity for yourself.Back in July we featured here on the Mongabay Newscast the first ever recordings of North Atlantic right whales singing. If you listened to those recordings, the right whales repeat one sound, what’s called a gunshot call — not the most melodic of tunes. But as you’ll hear on this episode, humpbacks have a much bigger repertoire of calls.Here’s this episode’s top news:New monkey species found in Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearingDisaster strikes in Bolivia as fires lay waste to unique forestsNew UN report takes stock of renewable energy’s decade-long growth spurtWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Humpback whale breaching. Photo by Whit Welles, licensed under CC BY 3.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Jim Darling, a marine biologist who is here to play us some recordings of remarkably similar humpback whale songs from around the world.Darling and colleagues found that North Pacific humpback whale songs can be incredibly similar to each other — nearly identical, in fact. That means that our view of the whales as living in distinct groups might very well be wrong. And that view dictates a lot of the conservation measures we’ve designed to protect imperiled populations of humpbacks.Darling joins us today to talk about his humpback research and play us some of those recordings so you can hear the similarity for yourself. Today we speak with Jim Darling, a marine biologist who is here to play us some recordings of remarkably similar humpback whale songs from around the world.Listen here: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animal Behavior, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Conservation, Environment, Interviews, Mammals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Research, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Paradise, polluted: Cook Islands tries to clean up its tourism sector

first_imgTourism accounts for almost 70 percent of the Cook Islands’ economy, but the industry is proving extremely damaging to its delicately balanced island ecosystem, and is contributing to islanders’ detachment from traditional ways of life.Now, though, some tourism players, activists and government officials are pushing the industry to change tack in hopes it can start to sustain the island’s people and culture while protecting its ecology, too.Tourism operators are being asked to live up to the sustainability street cred that the country’s 2017 decision to designate its entire exclusive economic zone as a multiple-use marine protected area has granted it on the international stage. This story is part of a series on Marae Moana, the massive, recently enacted multiple-use marine protected area covering the Cook Islands’ entire exclusive economic zone. Other stories in the series:Building the world’s biggest MPA: Q&A with Goldman winner Jacqueline EvansWill a massive marine protected area safeguard Cook Islands’ ocean?Give it back to the gods: Reviving Māori tradition to protect marine lifeCook Islands MPA leader fired after supporting seabed mining freezeRAROTONGA, Cook Islands — With its white sand, turquoise waters and train of dreamy desert islands just offshore, it’s not hard to see why Muri Lagoon hits the spot for holidaymakers. Situated on the east coast of Rarotonga, the largest and most populous of the Cook Islands, the lagoon is the biggest tourist attraction and collective revenue earner in the country.But in the spring of 2015, dark patches of noxious algal bloom began spreading across Muri Lagoon’s sandy floor, clouding up its famously clear water and prompting many visitors to turn up their nose at the prospect of diving in.A view of Muri Lagoon, Rarotonga. Image by Monica Evans for Mongabay.Why? Muri’s ebullient tourism sector had failed to deal appropriately with the waste left by those it welcomed. On Rarotonga, most people use septic tanks, which treat human waste to a basic level underground, then let it drain out through a septic drainage field or soak hole. But more than 90 percent of the businesses along Muri’s shore had non-compliant, substandard systems, and they proved woefully inadequate for the high number of visitors that year. Many of the systems had begun to leach nutrients into the lagoon, damaging its marine life and fueling the spread of the unsightly algae.Tourism makes up almost 70 percent of the Cook Islands’ economy and provides critical employment opportunities to counter out-migration trends. But the industry as it stands is proving extremely damaging to Rarotonga’s delicately balanced island ecosystem, and is contributing to islanders’ detachment from traditional ways of life. Now, though, some tourism players, activists and government officials are pushing the industry to change tack in hopes it can start to sustain the island’s people and culture while protecting its ecology, too.last_img read more

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Satellite collars to help boost protection for Nigeria’s largest remaining elephant herd

first_imgSix elephants in Yankari Game Reserve have been fitted with satellite collars.The collars are the latest steps to better monitor and protect elephants and other wildlife in the park.Fewer than 500 elephants remain in Nigeria, survivors of poaching and the steady loss of habitat. LAGOS — In early October, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) fitted six elephants in northern Nigeria’s Yankari National Park with satellite collars. The collars will help WCS, which works with the Bauchi state government to manage the park, better monitor and protect Nigeria’s largest remaining herd of elephants.“The elephants’ collars are quite valuable, not just for protection and for research, but also to reduce human-elephant conflict and promote tourism,” Andrew Dunn, Nigeria director of WCS, told Mongabay.“It will allow us to know where the elephants are and to make sure our rangers know where they are, watch them closely and make sure the elephants get close protection.”Dunn said rangers can now track the elephants’ movements and location better and react more quickly when the elephants are in danger or move closer to the edge of the park.Elephants once ranged from the tropical swamps and rainforests of the south of Nigeria to the savanna in the north, but a combination of poaching, human-elephant conflict, and deforestation from logging for timber and expanding agriculture have diminished these populations.Water buck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) at Yankari: the park is also home to buffalo, tantalus and patas monkeys, roan antelope, hartebeest, and lions. Image by Charles Emogor via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)Designated as a game reserve in 1956, Yankari was managed by regional authorities until it was designated a national park in 1991. In 2006, responsibility for the park was transferred to the government of Bauchi state, where it’s located. At the time, the elephant population was estimated at up to 350, but between 2006 and 2015 the reserve suffered intense poaching and the number of elephants fell sharply.“During this terrible period,” Dunn said, “Yankari was probably losing 20 to 30 elephants per year.”This period coincided with a wave of poaching across the continent, which saw elephant populations decline by around 111,000 across Africa. Some 415,000 elephants can be found in 37 range countries in the continent now. Survey data for Nigeria is inadequate, but the IUCN’s 2016 African elephant status report estimated the country’s remaining population at somewhere between 169 and 463.Around 100 savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana), one of the two species of elephants found in Nigeria, live in the 2,244-square-kilometer (866-square-mile) Yankari park, making it the largest and most viable herd in the country. Smaller populations of forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) can be found in the Omo Forest Reserve, Okomu National Park, and Cross River National Park in southern Nigeria. Yankari also provides a sanctuary for other wildlife, including lions (the genetically distinct West African lion is regarded as critically endangered, and just two small populations remain in Nigeria) as well as buffalo, hippopotamus, roan antelope and hartebeest.While investments were made in the reserve’s main tourist camp after the Bauchi state takeover in 2006, authorities found management of the protected area a challenge. A lack of resources left rangers underpaid, poorly trained and ill-equipped with vehicles or firearms needed to fight off organized, well-armed elephant poachers. Communities around the reserve, often angered by destruction of crops by elephants straying outside the park’s boundaries, were hostile to rangers.The signing of a co-management agreement with WCS in 2014 brought welcome expertise and additional resources to the park. With support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Lion Recovery Fund and the Elephant Crisis Fund, WCS provided rangers with training, field equipment and rations, camping allowances, and cash bonuses for arresting poachers. With increased frequency and coverage, ranger patrols were able to deter hunting, grazing and poaching.WCS also hired a team of “elephant guardians” from neighboring villages and gave them cellphones to serve as an early warning system whenever elephants strayed outside the reserve.“The health of Yankari elephants is now good. They are reproducing and hunting has been stopped, so definitely they will increase — but it will take time for them to fully recover,” Dunn told Mongabay.There have been no documented killings of elephants in Yankari since May 2015.“It is a huge progress because poaching has been much of a problem in the past,” says Modibbo Ahmed, the Bauchi state commissioner for tourism and culture.Elephants in Yankari Game Reserve. Image by Aminu Dahiru via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA-4.0)Strengthening protection for Nigeria’s elephantsThere are also ongoing efforts to protect remnant populations hanging on in other parts of the country. Emmanuel Olabode, coordinator of the Forest Elephant Initiative, thinks there could be as many as 80 elephants living in the Omo Forest Reserve in southwestern Ogun state, just 135 kilometers (84 miles) north of the commercial hub of Lagos.The reserve is under pressure from hunting, logging, and cocoa farmers, but the Forest Elephant Initiative, backed by the Nigeria Conservation Foundation, the Ogun State Ministry of Forestry, Wild Planet Trust UK, Whitney Wildlife Conservation Trust and several other NGOs, has put a team of 12 rangers into the reserve to limit further encroachment and allow wildlife populations to thrive.“To protect this unique species of elephants, we need to safeguard their habitat,” Olabode said. “The habitat is increasingly getting more fragmented which consequently may lead to total habitat loss if urgent action is not taken.”Despite the international ban on trade in ivory and Nigeria’s Endangered Species Act (2016), which criminalizes trade in elephant products, Nigeria remains a transit hub for the illegal trade in ivory to Asian countries.A recent survey by TRAFFIC, a U.K.-headquartered NGO working on wildlife trade, found raw and worked ivory was readily available for sale in Lagos.“Though most of the ivory comes from outside — Cameroon, Gabon, Congo — the [presence] of the ivory market still increases the pressure on the remaining populations in Nigeria,” Dunn said.Building on a National Ivory Action Plan drawn up in 2015 as well as new legislation stiffening penalties for illegal wildlife trafficking, in 2018 Nigeria joined the Elephant Protection Initiative (EPI), a group of 20 African countries working to close down the ivory trade and ivory markets and push member countries to develop National Elephant Action Plans.The EPI is funding a National Elephant Action Plan, which will identify important populations and actions needed to protect these elephants. It will also outline costs needed to implement these actions and seek out donors to raise funding for implementation.Banner image: WCS veterinarian Richard Harvey fitting a collar on one of the elephants. Image courtesy of Nacha Geoffrey/WCSFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Hunting, Law Enforcement, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Article published by terna gyuselast_img read more

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Coke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the Philippines

first_imgEnvironmental Policy, Plastic, Pollution, Waste, Water Pollution Multinational food and beverage companies Coca-Cola, Nestlé and PepsiCo are the main contributors to the world’s plastic waste, according to a recently released global report based on a massive brand audit by green groups across 51 countries.The audit, organized by Break Free From Plastic, a global movement, focused on plastic trash collected from 484 simultaneous clean-ups carried out around the world.In the Philippines in particular, Coca-Cola was found to be a prolific source of plastic waste, accounting for more than 2,800 pieces out of the 11,700 Coke-branded pieces of trash collected during the clean-up.While some of these companies have pledged to tackle the plastic problem, activists say they’re refusing to address the root of the problem by making a drastic switch away from plastic packaging. MANILA — In 2013, Coca-Cola Philippines released a new product for the local market: Coke Mismo, packaged in a 300-milliliter (10-ounce) PET bottled and launched at a star-studded event by stars from Glee, the hit television series, and local celebrity endorsers. Five years later, those same bottles, alongside other size offerings, would become among the most common items picked up during beach clean-ups nationwide. By 2018, Coca-Cola had become the top source of plastic trash in the Philippines — a feat it has repeated this year, based on an anti-plastic movement’s brand audit report.The report was a result of 484 simultaneous clean-ups conducted on Sept. 21 in 51 countries, including the Philippines, and spanning six continents, to mark World Clean-Up Day. The event saw more than 72,000 volunteers collect nearly 480,000 pieces of plastic waste, with 43 percent of the trash marked with a clear consumer brand.“By collecting waste from beaches, streets, homes, offices and parks and then counting what brands are on that packaging, the movement is holding fast-moving consumer goods companies accountable for their packaging,” the report says. “Only by highlighting the real culprits can we push them to change their packaging and destructive throwaway business model.”More than 11,700 PET bottles and other pieces of plastic waste gathered during the global drive came from Coca-Cola. The Philippines accounted for the biggest chunk, more than 2,800 pieces, of the Coca-Cola branded waste that was recorded in 37 countries. The company has a long history in the country; the Philippines was the first Asian country to get the brand’s bottling and distribution franchise, more than 100 years ago.Other companies whose plastic waste was commonly encountered during the clean-ups across the Philippines were multinational food and beverage giant Nestlé and Universal Robina, a local brand with a regional reach. Rounding out the top five were Unilever, a transnational consumer goods company, and Liwayway Holdings Company Ltd., a local snack food producer famous for its Oishi brand.More than 11,000 plastic Coke products were collected In 37 countries during World Clean-Up Day. Image courtesy of Break Free From Plastic’s Brand Audit Report 2019Worldwide, the top five plastic polluters identified by the report were Coca-Cola, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Mondelēz International (makers of Oreo cookies, among other brands), and Unilever.“Corporations like Coke and Pepsi topped the list because they use plastic bottles which are designed to be thrown away,” Von Hernandez of Break Free From Plastic, the global movement behind the report, told Mongabay. “And the fact is, these bottles are not recycled — you don’t produce one bottle out of another bottle with the same quality. Instead, what’s being done is to downcycle a plastic product but that’s just a stop-gap solution … we are just delaying the inevitability of throwing these away.”The proliferation of plastic waste in the environment, in particular the oceans, was triggered by the advent in the 1990s of the sachet economy, a paradigm to create a new consumer class in developing countries by packaging goods such as shampoo or instant coffee in affordable single-serving sachets. The throwaway culture that this engendered created a deluge of residual plastic waste that is today choking up seas and waterways; 93 percent of the plastic waste picked up for World Clean-Up Day comprised plastic bags (more than 59,000 pieces), sachets (53,000) and plastic bottles (29,000). The Philippines is one of the most prolific consumers of single-use plastic, going through 48 million shopping bags and 164 million sachets on a daily basis, according to data from GAIA, a worldwide alliance focused on finding solutions to the waste problem. The Philippines also ranked third out of 192 coastal countries for mismanaged waste that ends up in the oceans, according to a 2010 study.More than 50 percent of the waste generated in the Philippines is residual or unrecyclable waste, which poses a challenge for the country’s still-developing waste-management system. Some solutions are being initiated at the source: Coca-Cola unveiled a sample bottle last month made of 25 percent recycled plastic waste from the ocean and expressed its intention to recover its existing cans and bottles; Nestlé is aiming at making 100 percent of its packaging recyclable or reusable by 2025 and has opened its first waste-recovery program in Valenzuela City in Metro Manila, the site of numerous plastic factories.“They are concerned but they oppose policies that would ensure better collection rates for their packaging,” Hernandez said, adding that most of these companies oppose proposals to bring back deposit-return schemes, which would raise prices for consumers. “It doesn’t jive. Then you begin to wonder if they’re really sincere in addressing the pollution they created,” he said.A discarded PET bottle of Royal Tru Orange, a flavored carbonated drink distributed by Coca-Cola Philippines, left behind on a Philippine beach. The company’s packaging goes as small as 250ml or less. Image by MongabayHernandez said that even as businesses “talk about zero waste,” they hadn’t made any “serious attempts” to avoid the general production of plastic waste. “It will be impossible for the world to reduce plastic pollution without these brands making major changes to how they deliver their products,” the report says. “The time of relying on single-use packaging is over.”Companies still miss the mark when it comes to cleaning up their single-use plastic packaging, a Greenpeace report said last month. It warned that plastic production is still projected to “dramatically increase” in the coming years despite the existing waste problem.Governments around the world, however, are starting to act against plastics. Around 40 countries around the world have implemented a full ban on plastic bags and at least 30 are implementing a partial ban or considering a ban, according to data from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Development experts have also floated the idea of providing incentives for companies to encourage drastic shifts in consumption models and propel sustainable packaging designs.Several measures prohibiting the use of single-use plastics have been filed in both the Congress and Senate in the Philippines and President Rodrigo Duterte has been considering a ban on single-use plastics.“We reached the point that we have to address residuals,” Hernandez said. “Our national policy should be targeting that and extend producer responsibility … make these companies responsible for the plastic they produce and hold them accountable.”Banner image of littered Coke PET bottles collected from a beach clean-up in  Panglao Island, a prime tourist destination in the Philippines. Image courtesy of Plastic Free BoholFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by leilanicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredBrazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Philippine officials not spared as attacks on environmental defenders persist

first_imgArticle published by leilani Deforestation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Environmental Crime, Forests, Illegal Logging, Logging, Rainforest Logging, Threats To Rainforests Days after participating in a raid on illegal loggers, government environmental officer Ronaldo Corpuz was shot and killed by unknown assailants.Corpuz is the fifth environmental worker killed this year, with all the deaths linked to illegal logging, in a country that eco watchdog Global Witness has named the deadliest for environmental defenders.The killings come amid a largely successful government crackdown on illegal logging activities across the country.Environment department secretary Roy Cimatu has condemned the latest killing and renewed calls for lawmakers to approve additional funding to support the department’s enforcement bureau, which aims to arm rangers, among other measures. MANILA — The Philippine government has condemned the killing of an environmental official by unknown assailants last month — the fifth such incident this year, all of them related to illegal logging, in a country rated as the most dangerous for environmental defenders.The perpetrators shot Ronaldo Corpuz, a community environment and natural resources officer with the environment department, on Oct. 25 in the province of Nueva Ecija, on the main island of Luzon. Corpuz died two days later from the multiple gunshot wounds, his death adding to the growing list of government workers slain due to illegal logging activities in the country.The killings come as the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) carries out a massive crackdown on illegal logging activities in the country. The crackdown has contributed to a significant decrease in logging hotspots, from 25 in 2016 to 15 by December 2018, according to DENR data.“These senseless attacks against forest defenders must come to an end,” DENR Secretary Roy Cimatu said in a statement. He vowed to do everything in his powers “to protect DENR workers from fearless, cunning and greedy individuals who destroy the environment for their own selfish interests.”Cimatu also renewed calls for the swift passage of a bill that would create an enforcement bureau under his department, aimed at arming rangers, among other measures. Currently, the task of enforcement falls under the special operations unit of the department; the DENR has asked Congress for a 1.2 billion peso ($24 million) additional budget for 2020 to strengthen its operations.Days before the shooting incident, Corpuz had accompanied a Bantay Gubat (Forest Watch) team of rangers in a surveillance operation in Rizal, Nueva Ecija, which resulted in the arrest of three suspected illegal loggers and the seizure of yemane (Gmelina arborea) logs, an exotic timber species that’s protected by law in the Philippines. It’s not clear whether the attack against him was in reprisal for the arrests and seizure.Corpuz is the second DENR worker gunned down in the province this year. In September, department informant Gaudencio Arana, 55, was shot and killed in the town of Pantabangan, weeks after his pivotal role in dismantling an alleged illegal chainsaw operation in his coverage area.Forest ranger Bienvinido Veguilla Jr was killed last September in Palawan by alleged illegal loggers. Image from Veguilla Jr’s social media accountEarlier this year, two forest rangers were killed for their involvement in tackling illegal logging. On Feb. 21, Kandatu Bansil, 51, was shot dead by an unidentified gunman in the town of Lambayog in the province of Sultan Kudarat in Central Mindanao province, while Bienvinido Veguilla Jr., 52, was hacked to death in El Nido, Palawan, on Sept. 4.Zenon Teofilo Granada, 51, a municipal environment and resources officer in the town of Albuera in the province of Leyte, was gunned down at his home on Oct. 21. Granada’s case differed from the others, however; his attackers left behind a written note warning government official against allowing quarrying, sand and gravel operations, and illegal logging in the province. Police have linked the death to the outlawed New People’s Army.In a report published in July, the eco watchdog Global Witness called the Philippines “one of the deadliest countries in the world for people protecting their land or the environment.”“In 2018, the Philippines was the worst-affected country in sheer numbers, with 30 deaths,” it said in the report “Enemies of the State?”Nilo B. Tamoria, the DENR director for the region covering Sultan Kudarat, where Bansil’s killing occurred, said. “The work of a forester is not an easy task.” He added in a statement, “It is somehow associated with risk especially when they are assigned in the field and armed only with their desire of combatting illegal logging activities.”Banner image of a primary forest on the island of Mindanao. Image by Bram DemeulemeesterFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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