Secretive and colorful dryas monkey isn’t as rare as once thought

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Erik Hoffner Animals, Archive, Camera Trapping, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Interns, Mammals, Monkeys, Primates, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img In 2014, biologists discovered a population of critically endangered dryas monkeys (Cercopithecus dryas) living 400 kilometers (250 miles) south of their only known range in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Multi-level camera traps revealed that these stealthy monkeys are more common — and a lot weirder — than previously thought. They digest young leaves, snuggle up in impenetrable vine thickets, and sometimes boast an outrageous blue behind.In 2019, the IUCN downgraded their conservation status to endangered, and scientists are predicting a potentially positive future for the dryas. On a July day in 2014, biologists Henri Silegowa and Jean Pierre Kapale were buying rice in Bafundo, a village in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, when they noticed a dead monkey about to be cooked as bushmeat. In seven years of surveying the region’s primates, neither they nor their colleagues at the Lukuru Foundation’s TL2 Project had laid eyes on a monkey like this.“We were inside the fenced compound of a local woman, buying rice for our patrol teams, when I saw this tiny monkey hanging off the side of the kitchen. I’d never seen anything like it, and the woman said she did not know its name,” Silegowa recalls.The specimen was a small female, the size of a housecat. Her black face was cushioned in lushrusset fur and haloed by a white diadem. She had a pale blue rump. The hunter, when Silegowa tracked him down, called the monkey inoko. He’d traded the carcass for a few measures of rice.John Hart, scientific director of the TL2 Project, described her as “beautiful,” a “miniscule little animal.”Henri Silegowa and Jean Pierre Kapale noticed this mysterious monkey hanging in Bafundo, a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In seven years of studying the region’s primates, they’d never seen anything like it. Image courtesy of Henri Silegowa.At first, Silegowa and Hart thought the monkey might be new to science.“I checked our field guides, and couldn’t find anything that matched the photo we had of the inoko,” Silegowa says.  “There was not a single monkey in the field guide with that black face rimmed by orange, and with blue buttocks.”Hoping for more information, the TL2 Project posted a photo of the mystery monkey on its blog. Comments trickled in from researchers as far away as Japan and the U.S., identifying it as the dryas monkey (Cercopithecus dryas), the smallest member of the genus of monkeys known as guenons. The species was first described in 1932 by a German zoologist, Ernst Schwarz, but it was only known from a tiny patch of forest in the Wamba-Kokolopori region, nearly 400 kilometers (250 miles) to the northwest. Not surprisingly, at the time, the IUCN classified the species as critically endangered.The revelation struck Silegowa as a “big surprise.”“We knew we had found something special,” he says.So how did this little dryas monkey end up hanging as bushmeat in Bafundo?Bafundo sits in the Congo Basin, the world’s second-largest tropical rainforest, on the border of Lomami National Park. The region is a sparsely populated wilderness known as TL2 for the three rivers — Tshuapa, Lomami and Lualaba — that drain it toward Africa’s center.The TL2 Project, founded in 2007, has discovered biological riches here including bonobos (Pan paniscus), the striped giraffe-like animal known as the okapi (Okapia johnstoni), and around 700 African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis). In 2012, the team even stumbled upon a species of monkey unknown to science, which they named lesula (Cercopithecus lomamiensis).The mysterious monkey’s black face was encircled by a white diadem and wrapped in lush russet fur. Image courtesy of Henri Silegowa.When the bushmeat dryas appeared, the researchers had trouble believing this forest held yet another surprise for them.“At seven years in, they get this animal showing up dead in a village that they had no idea was there!” says Daniel Alempijevic, a graduate student at Florida Atlantic University who works with the TL2 Project. “The big surprise was, how has this [monkey species] been going under the radar for so long now?”Camera trap missionAlempijevic came in to tackle that question by setting up dozens of “multi-strata” camera traps in Lomami National Park and its buffer zone. Nobody knew where to look for the dryas, so he and his mentor, Kate Detwiler, an anthropologist at Florida Atlantic University, decided to place cameras on the ground, in the understory, and up in the canopy, sometimes at a dizzying 30 meters (100 feet) high.In the first month, not one of his cameras caught a dryas, but in the second round his persistence was rewarded with a few tantalizing seconds of video.“That first time we got one on a camera, I was just thrilled,” Alempijevic says. “After that, they just started trickling in. Now, it’s actually not an irregular sighting in the understory. It’s one of the more common monkeys we’re getting in that stratum.”A camera trap video shows a group of dryas monkeys moving through the rainforest’s dense understory in their careful, quiet manner. Video courtesy of Daniel Alempijevic/Primatology Lab/Florida Atlantic University and Ephrem Mpaka/TL2 Inoko Project/Frankfurt Zoological Society.This young dryas monkey posed for a minute-long video selfie. Video courtesy of Daniel Alempijevic/Primatology Lab/Florida Atlantic University and Ephrem Mpaka/TL2 Inoko Project/Frankfurt Zoological Society.An innovative strategy of placing camera traps at multiple levels in the forest has earned researchers an hour-and-a-half of footage of the elusive dryas monkey. This video collage includes the highlights. Video courtesy of Daniel Alempijevic/Primatology Lab/Florida Atlantic University, Ephrem Mpaka and Koko Bisimwa/TL2 Inoko Project/Frankfurt Zoological Society.Camera trap results show that dryas monkeys rarely venture up to the canopy, and the cameras have yet to catch them on the ground. Their preferred habitats are dense, swampy vine thickets in the understory, especially gaps where an old tree has fallen and dragged its tangle of woody lianas and skin-ripping rattans down with it.“It is a really difficult environment to penetrate,” Alempijevic says. “Total bushwhacking to get in. Lots of spines. I’m still pulling rattan spines out of my skin from a year ago!”This might explain how dryas monkeys have evaded human notice for so long. But now, thanks to the cameras, scientists have accumulated a total of an hour-and-a-half of footage.“We’re seeing so much more on the cameras than we could ever see with our eyes,” Alempijevic says.Portrait of a monkeyResearchers are piecing together a portrait of the dryas monkey as a master of stealth with a taste for leaves and an outrageous blue butt. Unlike other guenons, which make exuberant leaps and booming calls, dryas move silently. They whisper, murmur, chuckle and chirp.“In all our camera trap videos of this thing, we don’t have them making any calls we could use to locate them. That adds to their cryptic nature,” Hart says.Think of the dryas as that annoying little sister who wins every game of hide-and-seek by contorting herself into a nook where nobody would think to look, then stays hidden for hours after the game has ended to make sure she’s won.Hart describes the most recent encounter with this “hunker-down monkey,” in March 2019. The TL2 Project patrol came upon a single monkey on the forest floor. It vanished in a blur, then “snuggled right up into the vine thicket,” becoming an invisible furball. No running away. No alarm calls.“We spent over half an hour there, but the monkey would not move,” recalls Aimedo Onale, a member of the patrol. “We knew where it was, but we could not see it. Finally, I asked the machete man to climb nearby and shake the lianas to get the monkey to move, so we could get a photo.”After 30 minutes of searching a vine thicket, Onale and his patrol team finally earned this snapshot of a dryas monkey in their March 2019 encounter. Image courtesy of Terese Hart via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).The patrollers had never seen this kind of monkey before. They were deep in Lomami National Park, far from any previous sightings, but photos confirmed it was an adult male dryas, once again popping up in an unexpected place.That night, Onale sent a satellite message out to the TL2 Project team. It said simply, “Inoko ino” — dryas is here.The dryas monkey is a master of avoiding human notice, but don’t let that fool you into thinking it has a drab fashion sense.“When you get it in front of you, the coloration is just unbelievable. There’s no monkey that’s so vividly colored,” Hart says.The backside of a mature male dazzles like Fourth of July fireworks. A large patch of bare skin gleams aquamarine under the tail, extending to the testicles. Above that, a smaller patch of cherry-red skin highlights the anus. This colorful display is encircled by a ring of bright white fur, contrasting nicely with the monkey’s black limbs.Hart recalls the first male dryas he saw.“It was breathtaking. There was nothing like it in the field guides. The field guides remind me of those renaissance statues that someone subsequently had to come and put the fig leaf over. This thing is just — you can’t miss it!”When Daniel Alempijevic started researching dryas monkeys in 2016, he needed to ask local communities to report sightings of the species, but he had no photos of it alive, and he didn’t want people getting the idea that he wanted dead specimens. So he sketched this image of a dryas based on bushmeat. Image courtesy of Daniel Alempijevic.Not all males have the brilliant blue backside and testes. It might be age-related, hormonally induced, or a signal of health or status within the group.The monkey’s diet was another surprise for researchers. Alempijevic calls it “really strange.” Dryas eat insects, terrestrial mushrooms, and the green inner bark of lianas, but their favorite food appears to be young leaves, an infamously difficult food to digest.“They’re eating a lot of herbaceous material, which is unusual for a small monkey,” Alempijevic says.Some animals have evolved adaptations for digesting leaves, such as the goat’s four stomachs or the leafcutter ant’s fungus gardens. Some large primates, like colobus and proboscis monkeys, eat leaves too, but small monkeys usually rely on energy-dense foods like fruits and insects. Just how the dryas extracts energy from its leafy diet remains a mystery.A positive future?In January 2019, the IUCN downgraded the dryas monkey’s conservation status from critically endangered to endangered. Theworldwide population is still extremely small, totaling 100 to 250 adults by IUCN estimates, but Hart predicts the number will rise. Neither habitat loss nor hunting poses an existential threat at this time.“[The dryas monkey] can’t make it in an oil palm plantation as far as we know, but it’s able to sneak around and do pretty well in vine thickets on the edges of little towns,” Hart says.The first male dryas monkey found by the TL2 Project was killed by a hunter and laid out on a mongongo leaf, showing off its bright blue behind. Image courtesy of Daniel Alempijevic.Dryas prefer forest disturbed by wind storms, floods and elephants. That evolutionary preference is now working to their advantage, as humans dot the landscape with abandoned gardens and fallow fields.“We’re actually finding more dryas monkeys around the edges of these abandoned gardens than we are within the national park in protected sites,” Alempijevic says.As for hunting, dryas avoid snares by staying off the ground, and they evade hunters’ notice with their small size and cryptic behavior.“They don’t seem to be a target for hunters. If a hunter opportunistically has a chance, they will kill one, but they’re not seeking them out like the larger-bodied primates,” Alempijevic says.Hart says he hopes more scientists will search for dryas, now that they know how to look for it with camera traps, and work to conservethe pockets of forest where it lives. The goal, he says, is to protect the habitat of these quiet, colorful monkeys, “so they can continue to hunker down and do their thing.”A rare photo of two dryas monkeys “hunkering down” outside Bafundo village in 2016. The IUCN downgraded the species’ conservation status from critically endangered to endangered after a population was discovered in Lomami National Park. Image courtesy of Pablo Ayali.last_img read more

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Saints deserve a better deal

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 But who dat say it’s a home game? The Saints have shrugged their shoulders all week, but when NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue announced the decision two weeks ago, Coach Jim Haslett said it “put us behind the 8-ball.” The Saints made their feelings known when Tagliabue asked to address the Saints before their 23-20 win at Carolina last Sunday. They said no, choosing instead to have an emotional letter by New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin read to them. Neither are the Giants’ rivals in the NFC East happy about them getting an extra home game in a schedule, although most are biting their tongues. The NFL seems intent on turning Monday’s game into a telethon for Hurricane Katrina relief. Some Giants, including New Orleans native Eli Manning, have filmed a commercial where they lift off their jerseys to reveal Saints jerseys underneath, saying “We’re all Saints.” The NFL will announce Monday how proceeds from the games will be donated, and a Mississippi band, 3 Doors Down, will perform at halftime. All of this is well and good, but could it only happen in New York? The game could have been played in Houston or Atlanta, and it probably would have sold as many tickets as it has in New York (as of Friday, there were still 10-15,000 available, requiring the NFL to make an exception to its blackout policy). Or, if the NFL really felt like it needed the media exposure of New York, it could have done this: The Saints are scheduled to play at St. Louis on Oct. 23, while the Giants play host to St. Louis on Oct. 2. Instead, swap the sites of those games, having the Rams play in Baton Rouge or San Antonio on Oct. 23 and the Giants travel to St. Louis on Oct. 2. The same type of swap could work with the Vikings, who are scheduled to play at New York and home against New Orleans. That would leave everyone with eight home games, such as they are for the Saints. Granted, this would mean some scrambling for hotel rooms, charter flights and some grousing from St. Louis or Minnesota fans whose plans might have to change, but the NFL has managed crisis well before. When San Diego was hit by wildfires two years ago, the Chargers moved their game against Miami – with less than 36 hours notice – to Phoenix, refunded all tickets sold and opened the gates for free. After 9/11, the NFL spent $7.5 million to buy out a car dealers’ convention so it could move the Super Bowl back a week in New Orleans. On Monday they’ll have former NFL stars such as Bart Starr, Marcus Allen and Art Shell, among others, manning the phone banks. It’s a gesture that shouldn’t be overlooked, but it would be nice if the NFL did a little more to make the Saints feel at home. Not so selfish: Geez, maybe Green Bay’s Pro Bowl receiver Javon Walker – now out for the season with a torn ACL – had a pretty good point about wanting to negotiate a new deal with two years left on a five-year, nearly $7.5 million deal. He just became next offseason’s poster boy for every player and agent wanting a new deal. T.O. talk: San Francisco linebacker Derek Smith isn’t the talkative type – until the subject of facing former teammate Terrell Owens came up this week. “I think we’re better off without him, absolutely better off without him,” Smith, an eight-year pro, told reporters. “I don’t think he buys into anything but his own thing. I think (the Eagles) can get by (with Owens’ antics). But you put a bad apple in with a bunch of good apples and it’s just a matter of time before the other apples spoil. That’s my opinion.” Owens opinion? “Who is that?” he said. What we’ll learn in Week 2: if the Patriots can’t run Corey Dillon any better against the Panthers than they did against the Raiders, it is not a good sign. If the Raiders can slow Priest Holmes like they did Dillon (until the fourth quarter), they should be encouraged. It’s early, but: Not to get carried away, but if the Colts beat Jacksonville at home for the first time in three years, it may be a long time before they lose. Their next five games: Cleveland, at Tennessee, at San Francisco, St. Louis and at Houston. Then they have a bye before the trip to the Foxboro House of Horrors on Nov. 7. Mr. Nice Guy: Is there something about the water in St. Louis? Explaining Mike Martz’s decisions is one thing, but explain this message left on the voicemail of St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist Bernie Miklasz by Samir Suleiman, the Rams’ director of football operations, after Miklasz wrote that Rams executives should support Martz instead of backstabbing him: “Tell your source that I’m not a backstabber, I’m a (expletive) throat slasher, and he’ll know the difference before it’s all said and done.” East Bay to Tampa Bay: The Buccaneers’ logo, general manager Bruce Allen and coach Jon Gruden aren’t the only things that scream Raiders. This week, rookie fullback Rick Razzano was suspended for steroid use, cornerback Torrie Cox had his second DUI arrest in nine months, and assistant coach Jay Gruden, Jon’s younger brother, was also busted for driving under the influence. Oh, and they beat Minnesota. Just win, baby. L.A. not so Super: With the Manhattan stadium proposal falling apart with New York’s unsuccessful bid for the 2012 Olympics, the 2010 Super Bowl, which had been awarded to the city, is back on the block. But Los Angeles isn’t a candidate since a new stadium won’t be completed here until at least the 2009 season and the NFL wants any new stadium to have been online for a season prior to the Super Bowl to work out any kinks. — Billy Witz covers the NFL for the Daily News. His column appears each Sunday during the season. He can be reached at (818) 713-3621 or [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! If it’s not enough of a handicap moving their entire operation to San Antonio, where they’ll play three games, and playing four more in Baton Rouge, the Saints will play their home opener Monday night against the Giants at … Giants Stadium. The end zones will be painted black and gold with “Saints” and fleur-de-lis, and New Orleanians Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr. and Irvin Mayfield will perform the national anthem and America the Beautiful. The Saints will even get the usual 60 percent take of the home gate. center_img The New Orleans Saints sure look like America’s Team. They’re on the cover of national magazines, the subject of national news programs and all of a sudden find themselves with legions of fans who don’t spell the family dog’s name Phydeaux. What they feel like is America’s Orphans. last_img read more

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U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance unveils the Face of Farming & Ranching winners

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest From the cotton fields in the South Plains of West Texas and broilers and cattle of Shenandoah Valley in Virginia to America’s Dairyland in Wisconsin and the broad diversity of pigs, sheep, corn and soybeans in Ohio, the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance’s (USFRA) next class of Faces of Farming & Ranching capture the passion behind agriculture and drive for sustainability and technology on today’s farms.Unveiled at the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) Convention in Kansas City, the winners include two Ohioans: Emily Buck of Marion County and Lauren Schwab from Butler County.Buck farms with her husband John and daughter on their 1,000 acres of no-till farmland in the Lake Erie and the Mississippi River watersheds. They farm corn, soybeans and a flock of 40 Southdown ewes.“I have different hats from the farmer, to the mother to the shepherd, but one of my big roles is an associate professor at Ohio State,” Buck said. “I think that lends to credibility when working with other educated mothers and consumers. When I am looking at research I am looking at how well the research was done and what I am saying I really believe.”Click here to watch Buck’s video.Schwab works on her 1200-sow breed-to-wean family pig farm in Butler County. As the farrowing house manager, she is a week one specialist to ensure all piglets get off to the best start.“I am very passionate about animal care and taking care of those piglets and getting them off to the best start possible. I am really excited about the opportunity to meet with new people, educating them and opening up my farm gate to give them the confidence that when they go to the grocery store they can feel good about what they are purchasing and know the farmer behind that plate,” Schwab said. “Food safety is really big and we want consumers to know we work one-on-one with our veterinarian and we go through a pork quality assurance program. We take every measure possible to make sure we are producing a safe affordable and abundant food supply.”Click here to watch Schwab’s video.Other Faces of Farming & Ranching winners include Lauren Arbogast of Virginia, Jeremy Brown of Texas, and Katie Roth of Wisconsin. These incredible farmers will share their personal stories through influential conversations on a national stage with consumers, influencers and end users to help earn consumer trust and confidence in U.S. food and agriculture.“Agriculture today is driven by technology and an unparalleled commitment to animal care, and this group of exceptional farmers and ranchers are such an accurate portrayal of the entire agricultural community,” said Brad Greenway, USFRA Chairman and South Dakota crop and livestock farmer. “With their sustainable practices ranging from no-till and cover crops to pollinator habitat and state-of-the-art animal facilities, I’m proud to have these five represent USFRA and all of agriculture.”The public will get to know this group of farmers and ranchers through public appearances, national media interviews, web chats, blog posts, social media activities and more. For more information on the Faces of Farming & Ranching program and the winners, visit www.fooddialogues.com/farmers-ranchers. Also, contact Paul Spooner ([email protected]) to arrange interviews with the Faces of Farming & Ranching. Follow the conversation online at @USFRA #FoodD.last_img read more

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12th Annual NAHB National Green Building Conference

first_imgDon’t forget to stop by and visit the Fine Homebuilding and Green Building Advisor booth if you make it to the show! The Conference has a new GreenTensive education track: a day-long series of five sessions—attend as many as you like—each focused on a specific green practice. Choose from Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, Indoor Environmental Quality, Resource Efficiency, and Lot Design, Preparation and Development. The sessions will be facilitated by experts who will lead small groups in enriching discussions leading to problem-solving and discovery. And don’t miss these sessions:– The Economics of Green Homes and Green Home Building– Quality Management for High Performance Homes– Water Conservation: A Balance of Technology and Behavior– Keeping Them Honest: The Truth Behind Green Product ClaimsAlso, be sure to check out our new session on the proposed Home Star Act. See a complete list of education sessions here . Register now at www.nahb.org/greenbuildingconference .Login to the Conference Facebook or Linkedin page, or Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/nahbgreen . and share your questions about the five session topics of the GreenTensive Track. What do you want to know as a builder? Visit the Green Building Advisor / Fine Homebuilding BoothOnce again, we’ll be at the National Green Building Conference, this year in Raleigh-Durham, NC. Swing by the booth for a chance to talk to Pete (Technical director of GBA), Dan (Senior web producer for GBA and FHB), and Brian Pontolilo (editor of FHB). Also, expect Carl Seville and Michael Chandler to be milling about.center_img NAHB’s Press Release:A Real-World Education in GreenRegister now for the 2010 NAHB National Green Building Conference, where you’ll get the information that you need on building green in education sessions and on the streets—on our Tour of Green Homes . The tour features two luxury homes, one a Craftsman-style with lots of outdoor living space, the other a rustic beauty that incorporates local yellow pine from trees harvested within 70 miles. You’ll also see green workforce housing, a house built to NAHB ANSI 700 Green Building Standard Gold and other amazing green projects.last_img read more

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Touch Football Attracting Big Names at World Masters

first_imgRugby league legend Mark Geyer has selected National Rugby League referee Shayne Hayne to be in his touch football team, MG’s Maulers, at the Sydney 2009 World Masters Games.Shayne entered a Games competition to play alongside Mark and his brother-in-law, fellow rugby league premiership winner Greg Alexander, at the world’s largest multi-sport event and was one of the 14 men that Mark picked from a bumper entry.Also in the MG’s Maulers side, which will contest the men’s 40+ category of the Games touch football competition at two St Marys venues from 12-15 October, is former Parramatta Eels and Australia Kangaroos halfback John Kolc.“I’m absolutely delighted with the touch footy team I’ve put together to play as MG’s Maulers at the Sydney 2009 World Masters Games,” said Mark, one of 19 famous Australian and international faces who are ambassadors for the major event.“The Games are as much as about making friends and having fun as they’re about playing hard and winning medals but I’d like to think MG’s Maulers, including Shayne, will have a red-hot go at striking men’s 40+ touch footy gold.”Running 10-18 October, the Games are open to everyone rather than just elite athletes and will see 25,000 people from more than 100 countries compete in 28 sports across 72 Sydney venues, including many renowned Olympic sites.To enter the Games people need only meet their sport’s minimum age, which ranges between 25 and 35 years. Swimming is one of the sports open to people as young as 25, with most of the sports, including touch football, open to people aged 30 plus.But time is fast running out for people to sign up for the Games, with registrations only open at www.2009worldmasters.com until Friday 31 July – two weeks today.Don’t let the Games begin without you!last_img read more

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7 hours ago​Brighton defender Webster: Home form vital for survival

first_imgAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say ​Brighton defender Webster: Home form vital for survivalby Ansser Sadiq7 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton defender Adam Webster believes that it is the side’s home form that will keep them in the Premier League. Albion are hoping they can steer clear of relegation trouble for the season and establish themselves as a top flight club.With two home games to come against Everton and Norwich City, Webster knows it is so important to get maximum points in most of their home clashes.Their last home game was a mightily impressive 3-0 win over Tottenham.Webster admitted to reporters: “Our home form is going to be crucial and we want to make it a fortress at the Amex.”Hopefully starting Saturday we can get another win on the board.” last_img read more

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Video: Colin Cowherd Thinks Nick Saban Would Leave “In A Heartbeat” For The Right NFL Job

first_imgColin Cowherd calls out Alabama on ESPN.COLIN cowherd alabama walmartOn numerous occasions, Alabama head coach Nick Saban has told reporters that he has no interest in leaving Tuscaloosa for another job. FOX Sports radio host Colin Cowherd doesn’t seem to believe him.Monday, Cowherd discussed the topic of Saban potentially leaving for an NFL job – like the Indianapolis Colts head coaching gig. He thinks that if the offer were right, Saban would go. He also doesn’t believe that Saban’s wife’s preferences really factor into the [email protected]: Don’t be naïve. Nick Saban would leave for the NFL in a heartbeat if the job is right #HerdHere https://t.co/DX6ZM1ERTC— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) January 4, 2016There are going to be a number of NFL head coaching jobs opening up in the coming weeks. We’ll see if Saban entertains any of them.last_img read more

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Woman commits suicide by jumping in front of Metro

first_imgNew Delhi: A woman allegedly committed suicide by jumping in front of a running Metro train on Monday morning. The deceased, identified as Aisa Khan, a resident of Roshanara Garden in Delhi’s Shakti Nagar area. No suicide note was found from the lady’s possession. The incident led to suspension of Metro services between Samaypur Badli and Vishwavidyalaya on Yellow Line and commuters faced inconvenienced during peak morning hours. The body was found on the tracks of the GTB Nagar Metro Station. The Azadpur Metro Police Station received information about the incident at 8:45 am. Khan, committed suicide by jumping in front of an approaching metro at the GTB Nagar Metro Station’s platform number 2, police said. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderAisa Khan, a resident of Roshanara Garden in Delhi’s Shakti Nagar area, was rushed to Bara Hindu Rao hospital after she was found on the tracks but was declared brought dead, police said, adding Khan reportedly died on the spot. Following this commuters were greatly inconvenienced to reach their work places as Yellow line is one of the busiest lines. Passengers were stranded at various metro stations, including Vishwavidyalaya, GTB Nagar, Adarsh Nagar, Jahangirpuri, Rohini Sector 18 and Samaypur Badli metro station. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsThe DMRC in a tweet said: “Delay in service between Samaypur Badli and Vishwavidyalaya on Yellow Line due to a passenger on track at GTB Nagar. Normal service on all other lines.” The DMRC officials after a few minutes claimed that operations resumed normally on the Yellow line. No suicide note was found from the lady’s possession. However, one mobile number was recovered from her purse. Efforts are on to ascertain further details about the deceased, police said.last_img read more

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Moose Jaw TimesHerald to cease publication after more than a century

first_imgMOOSE JAW, Sask. – The Saskatchewan newspaper where former CBC radio host Peter Gzowski got his start in journalism is closing down after more than 125 years in the business.The last edition of the Moose Jaw Times-Herald is to be published Dec. 7.Roger Holmes, president of Star News Publishing Inc., says the newspaper’s website will also be shut down. The 25 employees affected by the closure were informed Wednesday.“It’s always difficult to make a decision that affects those employees and affects a newspaper that’s been going in Moose Jaw since the 1800s, but economic conditions make it quite clear that it simply cannot continue the way that it has been continuing,” he said in a telephone interview.Holmes said the Times-Herald couldn’t withstand all the challenges facing small-town newspapers, including declining readership and increased costs.Star News Publishing owns several other community newspapers in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Holmes said those papers will continue to publish for now.The Times-Herald was founded as a weekly paper in 1889 and went daily in 1906. Holmes said Gzowski, who was host of CBC’s “Morningside” radio program for 15 years got his first job at the newspaper.“It has a storied history,” Holmes said.Its ownership has changed hands many times over the years. Holmes purchased the paper, which still published from Tuesday to Saturday, in 2016.There are plans to celebrate the newspaper’s history and all it has brought to the community, Holmes said.“This is not going to be a funeral. It’s going to be a celebration of a life.”last_img read more

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