ASI publishes first Global Benchmark Reports on Membership and Fundraising Performance

first_img  40 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 ASI publishes first Global Benchmark Reports on Membership and Fundraising Performance Fundraising performanceThe top concerns amongst fundraising staff surveyed were:• a lack of mobile and online fundraising capabilities•  their inability to measure donor engagement adequately.Their principal goals were:• increasing donations• acquiring new donors• expanding donor engagement.Their top priorities were:• to accessing better donor intelligence• leveraging online/mobile fundraising opportunities.In addition ASI found that:• 30% of fundraisers surveyed did not know their overall retention rate• 45% have declining or stagnant retention rates. Oddly, improving donor retention is not an important priority.• 40% acknowledge they offer no mobile options, yet another 29% report they generate up to half of all their donations online.You can download the Global Benchmark Reports 2015 on Membership and Fundraising Performance from ASI. Free registration is required for each. Tagged with: Membership Research / statistics About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Advanced Solutions International (ASI) has published its first global analysis of how membership and fundraising staff are using technology and what are their key challenges, goals and priorities.The Global Benchmark Reports on Membership and Fundraising Performance will become annual publications.The first reports are based on survey results of 534 membership executives and 326 fundraising executives at association/membership and not-for-profit organisations across the US, Canada, Asia-Pacific and Europe. The surveys took place in the Summer and Autumn of 2014.The 20-question surveys were sent via email to senior-level executives at organisations of various sizes and in different sectors. They addressed five areas:• demographics• performance• technology• website/mobile• goals.Membership performanceThe biggest challenge faced by membership staff was an inability reliably to measure member engagement, a result of inadequate reporting tools.Their top goals were• increasing member engagement• retention• new member acquisition.Their top priorities were• improving member intelligence/reporting capabilities• enhancing online/mobile self-service.Challenges in mobile, retention and measurementOther findings include:•  40% of all survey participants say that they do not offer mobile options to their members•  67% have seen declining or stagnant retention rates in the past year• 32% do not know how their overall engagement rate has changed in the past year Advertisement Howard Lake | 28 January 2015 | Newslast_img read more

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What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Here is our carefully culled top picks from dozens of Pasadena events – the very best things to taste, watch, listen to, and experience, all presented weekly in our e!Pasadena email newsletter: More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News Herbeauty18 Ways To Get Rid Of HiccupsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Dark Side Of Beauty Salons Not Many People Know AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCouples Who Stuck With Each Other Despite The Cheating ScandalHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Top of the News center_img Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS top box 5 What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena Published on Friday, January 15, 2016 | 12:56 pmlast_img read more

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Carr’s plans to slash road mileage through ships

first_imgCarr’s Flour expects to cut over 250,000 truck miles and 4,000 lorry journeys from its wheat distribution operation by shipping grain for its Hutchison’s mill to the newly restored port at Kirkcaldy.The port has been upgraded so that it is able to receive grain cargo ships in an initiative spearheaded by Carr’s after the harbour fell into disrepair almost 20 years ago. The Scottish Government helped fund the project with a grant of £800,000 for the installation of new silos and conveying equipment, while Forth Ports, which owns the harbour, also invested in its restoration.Grain from Canada and Germany, which was previously trucked from ports in Liverpool and Perth, respectively, will now be shipped directly to Kircaldy, as will wheat from the south east of England, meaning the mill will not be so reliant on wheat grown in the north of England.Duncan Monroe, managing director, Carr’s, said the project was not driven by cost considerations. “It’s more about quality, consistency and continuity of supply, plus the very real environmental benefits.”We think this sea route could become even more important in the future as more low-quality wheat is grown in the north of England to feed the massive bio-ethanol plants.”A £200m bioethanol plant is due to open near Hull in 2012, joining a plant in Teesside, which opened in 2010.Jim Duncan, sales director for Scotland, added: “It’s good to see ships berthed alongside our wheat silos once more. At the same time, we have reduced the number of lorry journeys into the mill by 4,000 per year.”last_img read more

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War on graft in mining, palm oil hit by new law weakening Indonesian enforcer

first_imgIndonesia’s anti-corruption commission and its supporters have warned that the passage of a new law will severely hamper the fight against graft, including in the natural resources sector.The law is the culmination of more than a decade of attempts by parliament — whose members have frequently been charged and convicted of corruption — to curb the powers of the commission known as the KPK.The KPK had in recent years intensified its focus on tackling graft in the mining, plantation and natural resources industries.The sector has long been rife with corruption, most commonly the issuance of permits and concessions by local officials in exchange for bribes from companies. JAKARTA — Laode Muhammad Syarif has been spearheading a critical war against corruption in Indonesia for the past four years.Since December 2015, he’s served as a leader of the Corruption Eradication Commission, the country’s antigraft agency, better known as the KPK. In recent years, the agency has intensified its efforts to crack down on the pervasive corruption in the natural resources sector.These cases range from the president of the state-owned power utility allegedly taking bribes to award contracts for the construction of a $900 million coal-fired power plant; local politicians busted for kickbacks from a palm oil company seeking to quash an investigation into its pollution of a lake; to a provincial governor allegedly taking bribes to allow land reclamation in a protected bay.This past July, Laode, who has a doctorate in environmental law and served on the IUCNs World Commission on Environmental Law, pledged the KPK’s continued commitment to cracking down on corruption cases in this sector through a joint initiative to “rescue Indonesia’s natural resources.”Speaking to Mongabay last week, however, he said he wasn’t so sure anymore whether the KPK can live up to that commitment.“Unfortunately I’m not optimistic,” he said at KPK headquarters in Jakarta. “If we see the government’s policies that seemingly only chase investments as much as possible, I’m not optimistic.”There’s been an outpouring of anger, grief, and even a mock funeral, in recent weeks leading up to and after the passage of a controversial bill that severely curtails the KPK’s ability to carry out investigations.Under the bill, passed by parliament on Sept. 17, the KPK is no longer an independent state institution. Instead, it becomes a government agency, staffed by the very civil servants it was originally tasked with monitoring, and overseen by a council handpicked by the president and parliament — a body of legislators who have often been the target of anti-corruption investigations.It has also been stripped of its authority to carry out independent wiretaps of suspects — one of the key weapons in its war on graft that has helped it achieve a near 100 percent conviction rate.“To be honest, I’m a little disappointed with all that’s happening recently,” Laode told Mongabay. He took a deep sigh and was silent for about 10 seconds before going on: “I don’t see a bright future for environmental protection and the anti-corruption [movement] in the next five years.”KPK deputy head Laode Syarif, right, addresses the press on Oct. 28 as two of his colleagues display the confiscated bribe money. Image by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay.Reining in the KPKThe bill was passed in a record 12 days from the start of deliberations, ahead of the Sept. 30 end of the current legislators’ five-year term. The passage of the bill, along with proposed amendments to the criminal code, prompted massive protests by university students in Jakarta and other cities across Indonesia. They’ve called on President Joko Widodo to issue an executive order that would quash the new law.But despite having built his career on a reformist image and making the fight against corruption one of his priority agendas during his campaign, Widodo has made it clear that he will not intervene to prevent the new law from being enacted.Parliament has repeatedly tried to curb the KPK’s powers since it was established in 2003, pushing a series of series of bills to that effect in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2017. In 2011, one lawmaker, now a deputy speaker, even proposed dissolving the KPK, on the grounds that the commission was simply too powerful and working unchecked.But with the KPK consistently rated the most trusted of Indonesia’s notoriously corrupt state institutions, there’s a widespread sense among the public that parliament’s attempts to rein in the KPK are self-serving: In the past five years alone, more than 250 national and local legislators have been from charged and convicted by the KPK. Twenty-two of them were members of parliament, including speaker Setya Novanto and deputy speaker Taufik Kurniawan. The KPK has also targeted local governors, mayors and district chiefs, many of them for issuing mining, plantation or logging permits in exchange for bribes to fund election campaigns.The commission has also not spared the Widodo administration. In the past year, it has charged two ministers with corruption — one of them in connection with the coal power plant project — and is investigating two others implicated in separate cases. The president’s chief of staff, Moeldoko, was widely ridiculed for justifying the passage of the new bill by saying that “The institution of the KPK can hamper investment efforts.”University students heading towards the Indonesian parliament’s building in Jakarta to protest against the new KPK law. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.‘Disturbing’ the tycoonsFor anti-corruption activist Emerson Yuntho, the KPK is the only state institution that the public can rely on when it comes to fighting graft in the natural resources sector.“It’s the one that we can still pin our hopes on to solve mafia practices in the forestry, plantation and mining sectors,” he said.The commission’s “death” under the new law will be music to corruptors’ ears, according to Edi Sutrisno, executive director of TuK Indonesia, an NGO that advocates for social justice in the agribusiness sector.Under the KPK’s watch, he said, businesses had been obliged to play by the rules, such as paying taxes, especially after the KPK began focusing on corruption in the natural resources sector in 2014. That initiative entailed, among other measures, a massive effort to review thousands of licenses held by mining companies across the country.The KPK found more than a thousand mining companies operating without proper permits in forest areas, and pegged the state losses as a result at 15.9 trillion rupiah ($1.1 billion) per year.“The KPK has repeatedly campaigned for increasing state tax revenue from the natural resources sector, such as palm oil and mining,” Edi said. “The KPK is forcing these tycoons to really pay taxes. This of course disturbs [them].”Since 2016, the KPK has also been looking into the palm oil sector under a similar initiative. At the same time, the Widodo administration has been loosening environmental protections and easing investments in the extractives industries.Nur Hidayati, executive director of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), said the efforts to weaken the KPK were part of a grand design to allow business tycoons to extract even more natural resources in Indonesia and operate outside the rules without worrying about being prosecuted. She cited the example of a 2018 government regulation on integrated business permit issuance, which allows companies in certain sectors, including forestry, coal mining and palm oil, to acquire a business permit without first conducting an environmental impact assessment.Walhi recently filed a legal challenge against the regulation.Greenpeace activists protest in front of the KPK building in Jakarta in 2009, calling for the arrest of the Indonesian minister of forestry over permits handed out in Riau province. Azmun Jafar, a district chief from the province, is depicted as behind bars. Photo courtesy of Greenpeace/Flickr.‘Practically dead’The KPK’s job isn’t just to catch corrupt officials and company executives, said Hariadi Kartodihardjo, the commission’s forestry-sector investigator and a lecturer at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB). The KPK also works to improve the management of the country’s natural resources through its various initiatives, such as those on mining, palm oil, and the “rescue” of Indonesia’s natural resources.These are meant to support the government’s policies in the natural resources sector, including a moratorium on new palm oil permits, which Hariadi said was based on the KPK’s own palm oil initiative.With the KPK weakened, Hariadi said he was worried these initiatives will wither away.“If there’s no monitoring from the KPK, then [the initiatives] will be ignored, especially by local governments,” he said. “We know that the KPK no longer has authentic authorities [due to the new law], so they’re practically dead. So I fully agree that [the KPK] is in the process of dying.” This story was reported in part by Mongabay’s Indonesia team, with an earlier version published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 19, 2019. Banner image: University students heading towards the Indonesian parliament’s building in Jakarta to protest against several controversial bills, including the recently passed KPK law. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Activism, Coal, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Law, Featured, Forests, Governance, Mining, Palm Oil last_img read more

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EU/Chinese soy consumption linked to species impacts in Brazilian Cerrado: study

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored agribusiness, Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Farming, Food, Food Industry, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Forgotten Species, Global Trade, Globalization, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, International Trade, Land Use Change, Mammals, Plantations, Research, Savannas, Soy, Supply Chain, Trade, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife center_img The Brazilian Cerrado, the world’s largest tropical savanna, is a biodiversity hotspot with thousands of unique species and is home to 5 percent of the world’s biodiversity.However, half of the Cerrado has already been converted to agriculture; much of it is now growing soy which is exported abroad, particularly to the European Union (EU) and China, primarily as animal feed. But tracing soy-driven biodiversity and species losses to specific commodities traders and importing nations is challenging.Now a new groundbreaking study published in the journal PNAS has modeled the biodiversity impacts of site-specific soy production, while also linking specific habitat losses and species losses to nations and traders.For example, the research found that the consumption of Brazilian soy by EU countries has been especially detrimental to the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), which has lost 85 percent of its habitat to soy in the state of Mato Grosso. A giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) digs in the earth for food within a barbed wire-enclosed Cerrado field. Photo credit: ferjflores on VisualHunt / CC BY-SA.Ask Europeans how palm oil consumption is impacting biodiversity, and many will be quick to list threats to the emblematic orangutan, whose habitat in Indonesia has been drastically reduced by oil palm plantations grown for the international market. But ask those same citizens how the massive amount of soy imported from Brazil to feed European beef and dairy cattle, hogs and chickens is impacting biodiversity on the other side of the globe, and few would be able to list the habitat, let alone the species impacted.A recently published study in the journal PNAS by researchers at the Stockholm Environmental Institute adds to a growing collection of studies that increasingly will be able to answer that question.The new study, titled Linking global drivers of agricultural trade to on-the-ground impacts on biodiversity, used three datasets to study the specific links between Brazilian soy production, consumer countries, commodities traders, and habitat loss in the Cerrado, an exceptionally biodiverse savanna that is home to 5 percent of the world’s species.Now for the first time, this groundbreaking study pinpoints what countries and traders are responsible for habitat destruction and harm to 400 unique Cerrado species.“Biodiversity is such a spatially heterogeneous thing — a national analysis doesn’t always help much,” says Jonathan Green, lead author and Senior Researcher at the Stockholm Environment Institute at the University of York. “Because we have the fine scale production trade model, we are able to see the finer impacts: who is involved in the trade — both the countries and the private companies.”Brazil is one of the world’s largest producers and exporters of soy, which together with other industrial agribusiness commodities, is responsible for 70 percent of the deforestation in Latin America. The Cerrado biome has lost over half its 2 million square kilometers (772,204 square mile)* area to agriculture, with soy a leading driver. Although researchers have long established that soy production is contributing to biodiversity loss, it has been harder to determine how much, and where, individual traders and nations are responsible.The study found that while domestic consumption is responsible for 45 percent of the biodiversity impacts from soy production in Brazil, foreign consumers are still responsible for the majority of the negative biodiversity affects. Of foreign consumers, 22 percent of the impact was attributable to China and 15 percent to the European Union.Abhishek Chaudhary, assistant professor of environmental engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur told Mongabay that the advantage of a study like this one — looking at biodiversity on a more granular scale — is that it shows that not only overall volume matters, but specifically where losses are occurring and who is contributing.“One very surprising thing about the study is, if you look at international media, a lot say that China is the top importer of soy from Brazil and therefore China is the bad guy, because they are the top user,” says Chaudhary. “But because of [Brazil’s detailed] municipality level data, you can see that even though China is using most imports, their [habitat and biodiversity] impact is less because of where they are sourcing from.”Savanna being cleared for planting in the northern Cerrado. More than half the biome’s native vegetation has already been converted to agricultural production. Image by Sarah Sax / Mongabay.Pinpointing soy biodiversity impacts in supply chainsAlmost all of the soy exported from Brazil is used for animal feed, which means that because there is a long supply chain between Amazon soy and British chickens, much of that use is mostly undetectable to the consumer’s eye. “There is a naivety among consumers that soy is made into tofu,” says Green. But in fact, the vast majority of soy reaches consumers “embedded” in other products — particularly in meat and dairy.  “You have no visibility of what went into making meat. Soy is not on the ingredients list.”To remove this obstacle, the researchers looked at how soy flows from Brazil through Europe in the form of animal feed. By looking at this data, the study was able to demonstrate that countries like Germany, Great Britain and France have a much higher impact on biodiversity loss than does the Netherlands, even though the Dutch import more soy. Largely that is because a lot of soy imported to the Netherlands is then re-exported for animal feed.Impacts also depend on what’s eating the soy. In nations like Germany and Great Britain, the primary biodiversity impact comes through consumption of pork and poultry, versus places like Italy and Norway, where the main effect is through consumption of beef and dairy.The researchers also found that where in Brazil each nation’s soy is sourced matters greatly to impacts. The consumption of soy by EU countries, for example, has been especially detrimental to the habitat of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), charismatic mega-fauna that has lost 85 percent of its habitat to soy in the state of Mato Grosso.According to lead author Jonathan Green, “this kind of knowledge can be invaluable for helping companies and countries to source more sustainably and invest in less ecologically harmful agriculture.”Studies like this one are especially relevant and useful now for the EU, which is currently considering how to regulate “embedded” deforestation in the supply chains for the vast quantities of internationally sourced agricultural products it imports.Soy silos in the northern Cerrado. Six companies are responsible for half the Brazilian soy exports from the biome. Image by Sarah Sax / Mongabay.Looping in the private sectorThe new research also takes a close look at individual commodities traders operating in the Cerrado, of which only six — Bunge, Cargill, ADM, COFCO, Louis Dreyfus and Amaggi — are responsible for over half of all soy exports.“This paper bridges the company-level commodity supply chain model and biodiversity impacts,” wrote Keiichiro Kanemoto, an associate professor at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature in Japan who has published extensively on the connection between biodiversity impacts and global trade. He points out that while past studies have shown the link between consumption patterns and biodiversity threats through international trade on the country-level, this paper is the first to show the link between how a nation’s consumers and commodities traders are impacting a specific area’s biodiversity.The researchers combined datasets from Trase (which tracks soy trader data at the granular municipal level) with financial data regarding the flow of soy and biodiversity indexes showing suitable species habitat. By doing so, they were able to pinpoint not only the three municipalities that experienced the greatest losses of endemic biodiversity between 2000 and 2010 but that those losses there were dominated by three primary traders — ADM, Cargill, and Granol. Such pinpoint accuracy not only ascertains responsibility, it also allows for highly targeted action to resolve the problem, at the national, company or consumer level.“The most exciting advance in bringing together these sophisticated datasets and models is the level of accountability it makes possible,” stated study co-author Andrew Balmford of Cambridge University. “We can now start to see exactly which businesses and consumers are harming threatened species, where, how, and in unprecedented detail.”Citation:Green, J. M., Croft, S. A., Durán, A. P., Balmford, A. P., Burgess, N. D., Fick, S., … & Young, L. E. (2019). Linking global drivers of agricultural trade to on-the-ground impacts on biodiversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(46), 23202-23208.Banner image caption: A giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla). Image by Just chaos under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.* Correction: This story originally read that “the Cerrado biome has lost over 200 thousand hectares (789,600 square miles). It has been corrected to read “2 million square kilometers (772,204 square mile).”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Zondi, Birkett in Non-Stop Dusi record

first_img11 March 2013Andy Birkett and Sbonelo Zondi cruised to a comprehensive victory in The Unlimited Non-Stop Dusi Canoe Marathon raced between Pietermaritzburg and Durban on Friday, improving the overall K2 race record by a massive 17 minutes.Having suffered disappointing mishaps in their primary focus of the year, The Unlimited Dusi, two weeks ago, which saw them finish third and fourth respectively, Zondi (Team Kayak Racing) and Birkett (Team Best 4 Kayak Centre) came into the 110km “Dusi in a day” event with just one goal and that was to walk away victorious. Mission accomplished.‘Fantastic’“It’s fantastic to have won. Sbonelo and I combined really well and worked hard together throughout the day,” said Birkett.“I don’t think it was until late in the day that I thought we might have a chance of getting the record, but never did I ever think we’d beat it by as much as 17 minutes.“All my tears from Dusi are gone,” added an ecstatic Zondi. “I’m very happy right now. It’s an amazing position to be in and this is one for my future!The pair tussled with the likes of Thulani Mbanjwa and Zonele Nzuza, Richard and Nhlanhla Cele, Loveday Zondi and Siseko Ntondini and Gavin Shuter and Carl Folscher from the minute the starting gun went off. However, a decisive break on the Yellow Rock portage a third of the way through the day saw them fade off into the distance and remain well clear of their nearest rivals for the rest of the race.‘We sat back initially’“We sat back initially because the guys were quite aggressive and were making silly mistakes, so it was much better once things spread out a bit, and once we opened up a bit of a gap we just looked to go at our own pace and it was a matter of trying to keep it going all the way to the finish, which we managed to do,” said Birkett.Having occupied second place for much of the first half of the day, an unfortunate mishap at Hippo Rapid saw Mbanjwa and Nzuza break their flange, a major part of the steering mechanism, which they were able to repair only some way down the road at the Inanda Dam Wall portage.This opened the doorway for the Gauteng-based pair of Loveday Zondi and Siseko Ntondini to move up from third place and also helped them find a new gear as they aimed for Blue Lagoon in Durban.‘I couldn’t believe it’“We’d been going at quite a steady pace up until Tops Needle, but when our seconds told us we were in second place I couldn’t believe it. We just pushed as hard as we could and it all paid off,” said Zondi.“This is my biggest result ever and I’m very happy with our race today,” added Ntondini.Mbanjwa and Nzuza suffered further heartache as they watched Shuter (Team Best 4 Kayak Centre) and Folscher (Popes Matelec) cruise past them into third place, a position they held all the way to the finish, leaving Mbanjwa and Nzuza to finish fourth and the Cele brothers fifth.A monumental effort from Marc Germiquet saw him claim the honours as the first K1 across the line, in sixth position overall, after a ding-dong battle with Mark Mulder, before Mulder broke just below Island Rapid.DoublesOne of the many hot talking points of the day was the incredible mixed doubles’ and ladies doubles’ results as husband and wife combination Jen and Jacques Theron claimed a remarkable seventh place finish, while ladies winners’ Abby Adie and Hilary Pitchford held off a spirited effort from their male competitors to claim eighth.Adie and Pitchford also added their names to the record book as they obliterated the ladies K2 record by 28 minutes.“To finish in the top 10 overall and break the record is just amazing,” said Pitchford. “We had a really great race, with a couple of swims around Hippo, but Abs (Adie) was so strong and I couldn’t have asked for a better partner out there today.“It was my first Non-Stop Dusi and I had a really great time out there. It was really tough and I definitely took strain at times, but it was great!” reckoned Adie.RESULTSOverallAndy Birkett/Sbonelo Zondi 7:30.01Loveday Zondi/Siseko Ntondini 8:06.31Gavin Shuter/Carl Folscher 8:11.01Thulani Mbanjwa/Zonele Nzuza 8:19.06Richard Cele/Nhlanhla Cele 8:26.31Marc Germiquet 8:38.17Jacques Theron/Jen Theron 8:43.02Abby Adie/Hilary Pitchford 8:52.04Greg Carter-Brown/Kyle Dohne 8:54.29Shaun Dias/Luke Chalupsky 8:55.41WomenAbby Adie/Hilary Pitchford 8:52.04Mixed DoublesJacques Theron/Jen Theron 8:43.02Jakub Adam/Anna Adamova 8:55.48Kelvin Trautman/Sabrina Chesterman 9:11.33SinglesMarc Germiquet 8:38.17Craig Rees 9:25.31Mark MulderSAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Ateneo overwhelms UV to win 2018 PCCL title

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Suerte and hardworking big man Bassieru Sacko, who added 16 points and 12 rebounds for the Green Lancers, were the other two members of the mythical selection. ABL: Alab Pilipinas stays unbeaten at home, rips Hong Kong Photo by Mark Giongco/INQUIRER.netAteneo proved too much for University of the Visayas in a 95-71 win to capture its fourth Philippine Collegiate Champions League (PCCL) championship Monday night at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.The Blue Eagles zoomed to a 7-0 start before extending their lead to as high as 33 points. They never trailed and were never threatened.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Five Ateneo scored in double figures led by Isaac Go’s 15 points on 4-of-5 shooting from downtown. BJ Andrade had 13 points while Thirdy Ravena and Victor Berjay added 12 apiece.The sweet-shooting Go was named Finals MVP. Go was also joined by Ravena and Andrade in the Mythical Team.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsThe Eagles, who shot 51 percent from the field and limited the Green Lancers to just three field goals in the third quarter, claimed their fourth PCCL title overall.Guard Rey Suerte fired a game-high 26 points for UV, which hit only 32 percent of its field goal attempts and turned the ball over 24 times. Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

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Gilas Pilipinas meets with Filipino community in Qatar ahead of crucial game

first_imgGrace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations But if there’s a perfect time for Gilas to bounce back, it’s against Qatar.Its recent struggles hardly left the Nationals any room for error versus the Qataris with winning the only option if they want to keep their Fiba World Cup bid going.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Filipinos came out and showed their support for Gilas during a meet and greet event Tuesday.And there’s no better way for Gilas to show its appreciation than winning. “They’re very excited especially with the way they’ve been treated by the Filipino community,” national team head coach Yeng Guiao said in an interview with ESPN5’s Charmie Lising, who is in Qatar.“Actually, it’s also one of the reasons why we really want to win. Not only that we want to make the people back in the Philippines happy but also make the Filipinos here in Qatar happy,”Guiao added in Filipino.Winning, however, has been a rarity for the Philippine team as of late after dropping three of its last four games.ADVERTISEMENT Filipinos currently working and residing in Qatar are no exception as they reminded members of Gilas Pilipinas that they are certainly not alone in their battle on Friday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants LATEST STORIES Gilas Pilipinas is in Doha thousands of miles away from home as it prepares for a must-win duel against Qatar in the Fiba World Cup Asian qualifiers.But just like in nearly any part of the globe, Filipino communities abroad make any place feel like home.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss WATCH: Retired Chris Tiu plays piano version of Queen’s ‘Love of my Life’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Touch Football Attracting Big Names at World Masters

first_imgRugby league legend Mark Geyer has selected National Rugby League referee Shayne Hayne to be in his touch football team, MG’s Maulers, at the Sydney 2009 World Masters Games.Shayne entered a Games competition to play alongside Mark and his brother-in-law, fellow rugby league premiership winner Greg Alexander, at the world’s largest multi-sport event and was one of the 14 men that Mark picked from a bumper entry.Also in the MG’s Maulers side, which will contest the men’s 40+ category of the Games touch football competition at two St Marys venues from 12-15 October, is former Parramatta Eels and Australia Kangaroos halfback John Kolc.“I’m absolutely delighted with the touch footy team I’ve put together to play as MG’s Maulers at the Sydney 2009 World Masters Games,” said Mark, one of 19 famous Australian and international faces who are ambassadors for the major event.“The Games are as much as about making friends and having fun as they’re about playing hard and winning medals but I’d like to think MG’s Maulers, including Shayne, will have a red-hot go at striking men’s 40+ touch footy gold.”Running 10-18 October, the Games are open to everyone rather than just elite athletes and will see 25,000 people from more than 100 countries compete in 28 sports across 72 Sydney venues, including many renowned Olympic sites.To enter the Games people need only meet their sport’s minimum age, which ranges between 25 and 35 years. Swimming is one of the sports open to people as young as 25, with most of the sports, including touch football, open to people aged 30 plus.But time is fast running out for people to sign up for the Games, with registrations only open at www.2009worldmasters.com until Friday 31 July – two weeks today.Don’t let the Games begin without you!last_img read more

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